Vitamin B12 deficiency: Recognizing subtle symptoms in older adults

Thiruvinvamalai S. Dharmarajan, G. U. Adiga, Edward P. Norkus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vitamin B12 deficiency is a common but under-recognized, yet easily treatable disorder in older adults. Although several causes exist, food-cobalamin malabsorption is now believed to be the most common etiology. Complications of vitamin B12 deficiency are myriad, ranging from lethargy and weight loss to dementia. Causes of deficiency include failure to separate vitamin B12 from food protein, inadequate ingestion, absorption, utilization, and storage as well as drug-food Interactions leading to malabsorption and metabolic inactivation. The roles of B12 deficiency, elevated homocysteine and elevated methylmalonic acid in various disease states are still evolving. Timely screening and replacement of vitamin B12 will help prevent many complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-38
Number of pages9
JournalGeriatrics
Volume58
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Vitamin B 12 Deficiency
Vitamin B 12
Methylmalonic Acid
Food-Drug Interactions
Food
Lethargy
Homocysteine
Dementia
Weight Loss
Eating
Proteins

Keywords

  • Cyanocobalamin
  • Food-cobalamin malabsorption
  • Homocysteine
  • Methylmalonic acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Vitamin B12 deficiency : Recognizing subtle symptoms in older adults. / Dharmarajan, Thiruvinvamalai S.; Adiga, G. U.; Norkus, Edward P.

In: Geriatrics, Vol. 58, No. 3, 01.03.2003, p. 30-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dharmarajan, TS, Adiga, GU & Norkus, EP 2003, 'Vitamin B12 deficiency: Recognizing subtle symptoms in older adults', Geriatrics, vol. 58, no. 3, pp. 30-38.
Dharmarajan, Thiruvinvamalai S. ; Adiga, G. U. ; Norkus, Edward P. / Vitamin B12 deficiency : Recognizing subtle symptoms in older adults. In: Geriatrics. 2003 ; Vol. 58, No. 3. pp. 30-38.
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