Use of unproved cancer treatment by patients in a radiation oncology department: A survey

J. Goldstein, C. Chao, E. Valentine, B. Chabon, L. Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A survey of patients' use of unorthodox cancer therapies was conducted in the Department of Radiation Oncology of Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine (The Bronx, New York) in the summer of 1988. Twelve percent of the patients interviewed used unorthodox treatments, including special diets, metabolic therapy, and mental imagery, while receiving radiation therapy. These patients tended to be white and well educated. None used harmful therapies or refused conventional treatment. These results are consistent with those reported in the literature. Patients view their physicians as an important source of information about their disease and are often willing to discuss unorthodox treatments with their physicians. The authors recommend that physicians discuss the use of unconventional treatments with their patients in a nonjudgmental manner and alert them to any potential risks associated with those treatments. They also suggest that physicians offer patients the opportunity to participate in clinical trials as an alternative to using unconventional treatments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-66
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Psychosocial Oncology
Volume9
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Radiation Oncology
Neoplasms
Physicians
Therapeutics
Diet Therapy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Radiotherapy
Medicine
Clinical Trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychology(all)
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Goldstein, J., Chao, C., Valentine, E., Chabon, B., & Davis, L. (1991). Use of unproved cancer treatment by patients in a radiation oncology department: A survey. Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, 9(3), 59-66.

Use of unproved cancer treatment by patients in a radiation oncology department : A survey. / Goldstein, J.; Chao, C.; Valentine, E.; Chabon, B.; Davis, L.

In: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, Vol. 9, No. 3, 1991, p. 59-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goldstein, J, Chao, C, Valentine, E, Chabon, B & Davis, L 1991, 'Use of unproved cancer treatment by patients in a radiation oncology department: A survey', Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 59-66.
Goldstein, J. ; Chao, C. ; Valentine, E. ; Chabon, B. ; Davis, L. / Use of unproved cancer treatment by patients in a radiation oncology department : A survey. In: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology. 1991 ; Vol. 9, No. 3. pp. 59-66.
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