Use of computed tomography to assess volume change after endoscopic orbital decompression for Graves' ophthalmopathy

Bradley A. Schiff, Caitlin P. McMullen, Joaquim Farinhas, Alexis H. Jackman, Mari Hagiwara, Jason McKellop, Yvonne W. Lui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Orbital decompression is frequently performed in the management of patients with sight-threatening and disfiguring Graves' ophthalmopathy. The quantitative measurements of the change in orbital volume after orbital decompression procedures are not definitively known. Furthermore, the quantitative effect of septal deviation on volume change has not been previously analyzed. Objectives To provide quantitative measurement of orbital volume change after medial and inferior endoscopic decompression and describe a straightforward method of measuring this change using open-source technologies. A secondary objective was to assess the effect of septal deviation on orbital volume change. Methods A retrospective review was performed on all patients undergoing medial and inferior endoscopic orbital decompression for Graves' ophthalmopathy at a tertiary care academic medical center. Pre-operative and post-operative orbital volumes were calculated from computed tomography (CT) data using a semi-automated segmenting technique and Osirix™, an open-source DICOM reader. Data were collected for pre-operative and post-operative orbital volumes, degree of septal deviation, time to follow-up scan, and individual patient Hertel scores. Results Nine patients (12 orbits) were imaged before and after decompression. Mean pre-operative orbital volume was 26.99 cm3 (SD = 2.86 cm3). Mean post-operative volume was 33.07 cm3 (SD = 3.96 cm3). The mean change in volume was 6.08 cm3 (SD = 2.31 cm3). The mean change in Hertel score was 4.83 (SD = 0.75). Regression analysis of change in volume versus follow-up time to imaging indicates that follow-up time to imaging has little effect on change in volume (R = - 0.2), and overall mean maximal septal deviation toward the operative side was - 0.5 mm. Negative values were attributed to deviation away form the operative site. A significant correlation was demonstrated between change in orbital volume and septal deviation distance site (R = 0.66), as well as between change in orbital volume and septal deviation angle (R = 0.67). Greater volume changes were associated with greater degree of septal deviation away from the surgical site, whereas smaller volume changes were associated with greater degree of septal deviation toward the surgical site. Conclusion A straightforward, semi-automated segmenting technique for measuring change in volume following endoscopic orbital decompression is described. This method proved useful in determining that a mean increase of approximately 6 cm in volume was achieved in this group of patients undergoing medial and inferior orbital decompression. Septal deviation appears to have an effect on the surgical outcome and should be considered during operative planning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)729-735
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery
Volume36
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

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Graves Ophthalmopathy
Decompression
Tomography
Orbit
Tertiary Healthcare
Regression Analysis
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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Use of computed tomography to assess volume change after endoscopic orbital decompression for Graves' ophthalmopathy. / Schiff, Bradley A.; McMullen, Caitlin P.; Farinhas, Joaquim; Jackman, Alexis H.; Hagiwara, Mari; McKellop, Jason; Lui, Yvonne W.

In: American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 36, No. 6, 01.11.2015, p. 729-735.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schiff, Bradley A. ; McMullen, Caitlin P. ; Farinhas, Joaquim ; Jackman, Alexis H. ; Hagiwara, Mari ; McKellop, Jason ; Lui, Yvonne W. / Use of computed tomography to assess volume change after endoscopic orbital decompression for Graves' ophthalmopathy. In: American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery. 2015 ; Vol. 36, No. 6. pp. 729-735.
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abstract = "Background Orbital decompression is frequently performed in the management of patients with sight-threatening and disfiguring Graves' ophthalmopathy. The quantitative measurements of the change in orbital volume after orbital decompression procedures are not definitively known. Furthermore, the quantitative effect of septal deviation on volume change has not been previously analyzed. Objectives To provide quantitative measurement of orbital volume change after medial and inferior endoscopic decompression and describe a straightforward method of measuring this change using open-source technologies. A secondary objective was to assess the effect of septal deviation on orbital volume change. Methods A retrospective review was performed on all patients undergoing medial and inferior endoscopic orbital decompression for Graves' ophthalmopathy at a tertiary care academic medical center. Pre-operative and post-operative orbital volumes were calculated from computed tomography (CT) data using a semi-automated segmenting technique and Osirix™, an open-source DICOM reader. Data were collected for pre-operative and post-operative orbital volumes, degree of septal deviation, time to follow-up scan, and individual patient Hertel scores. Results Nine patients (12 orbits) were imaged before and after decompression. Mean pre-operative orbital volume was 26.99 cm3 (SD = 2.86 cm3). Mean post-operative volume was 33.07 cm3 (SD = 3.96 cm3). The mean change in volume was 6.08 cm3 (SD = 2.31 cm3). The mean change in Hertel score was 4.83 (SD = 0.75). Regression analysis of change in volume versus follow-up time to imaging indicates that follow-up time to imaging has little effect on change in volume (R = - 0.2), and overall mean maximal septal deviation toward the operative side was - 0.5 mm. Negative values were attributed to deviation away form the operative site. A significant correlation was demonstrated between change in orbital volume and septal deviation distance site (R = 0.66), as well as between change in orbital volume and septal deviation angle (R = 0.67). Greater volume changes were associated with greater degree of septal deviation away from the surgical site, whereas smaller volume changes were associated with greater degree of septal deviation toward the surgical site. Conclusion A straightforward, semi-automated segmenting technique for measuring change in volume following endoscopic orbital decompression is described. This method proved useful in determining that a mean increase of approximately 6 cm in volume was achieved in this group of patients undergoing medial and inferior orbital decompression. Septal deviation appears to have an effect on the surgical outcome and should be considered during operative planning.",
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T1 - Use of computed tomography to assess volume change after endoscopic orbital decompression for Graves' ophthalmopathy

AU - Schiff, Bradley A.

AU - McMullen, Caitlin P.

AU - Farinhas, Joaquim

AU - Jackman, Alexis H.

AU - Hagiwara, Mari

AU - McKellop, Jason

AU - Lui, Yvonne W.

PY - 2015/11/1

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N2 - Background Orbital decompression is frequently performed in the management of patients with sight-threatening and disfiguring Graves' ophthalmopathy. The quantitative measurements of the change in orbital volume after orbital decompression procedures are not definitively known. Furthermore, the quantitative effect of septal deviation on volume change has not been previously analyzed. Objectives To provide quantitative measurement of orbital volume change after medial and inferior endoscopic decompression and describe a straightforward method of measuring this change using open-source technologies. A secondary objective was to assess the effect of septal deviation on orbital volume change. Methods A retrospective review was performed on all patients undergoing medial and inferior endoscopic orbital decompression for Graves' ophthalmopathy at a tertiary care academic medical center. Pre-operative and post-operative orbital volumes were calculated from computed tomography (CT) data using a semi-automated segmenting technique and Osirix™, an open-source DICOM reader. Data were collected for pre-operative and post-operative orbital volumes, degree of septal deviation, time to follow-up scan, and individual patient Hertel scores. Results Nine patients (12 orbits) were imaged before and after decompression. Mean pre-operative orbital volume was 26.99 cm3 (SD = 2.86 cm3). Mean post-operative volume was 33.07 cm3 (SD = 3.96 cm3). The mean change in volume was 6.08 cm3 (SD = 2.31 cm3). The mean change in Hertel score was 4.83 (SD = 0.75). Regression analysis of change in volume versus follow-up time to imaging indicates that follow-up time to imaging has little effect on change in volume (R = - 0.2), and overall mean maximal septal deviation toward the operative side was - 0.5 mm. Negative values were attributed to deviation away form the operative site. A significant correlation was demonstrated between change in orbital volume and septal deviation distance site (R = 0.66), as well as between change in orbital volume and septal deviation angle (R = 0.67). Greater volume changes were associated with greater degree of septal deviation away from the surgical site, whereas smaller volume changes were associated with greater degree of septal deviation toward the surgical site. Conclusion A straightforward, semi-automated segmenting technique for measuring change in volume following endoscopic orbital decompression is described. This method proved useful in determining that a mean increase of approximately 6 cm in volume was achieved in this group of patients undergoing medial and inferior orbital decompression. Septal deviation appears to have an effect on the surgical outcome and should be considered during operative planning.

AB - Background Orbital decompression is frequently performed in the management of patients with sight-threatening and disfiguring Graves' ophthalmopathy. The quantitative measurements of the change in orbital volume after orbital decompression procedures are not definitively known. Furthermore, the quantitative effect of septal deviation on volume change has not been previously analyzed. Objectives To provide quantitative measurement of orbital volume change after medial and inferior endoscopic decompression and describe a straightforward method of measuring this change using open-source technologies. A secondary objective was to assess the effect of septal deviation on orbital volume change. Methods A retrospective review was performed on all patients undergoing medial and inferior endoscopic orbital decompression for Graves' ophthalmopathy at a tertiary care academic medical center. Pre-operative and post-operative orbital volumes were calculated from computed tomography (CT) data using a semi-automated segmenting technique and Osirix™, an open-source DICOM reader. Data were collected for pre-operative and post-operative orbital volumes, degree of septal deviation, time to follow-up scan, and individual patient Hertel scores. Results Nine patients (12 orbits) were imaged before and after decompression. Mean pre-operative orbital volume was 26.99 cm3 (SD = 2.86 cm3). Mean post-operative volume was 33.07 cm3 (SD = 3.96 cm3). The mean change in volume was 6.08 cm3 (SD = 2.31 cm3). The mean change in Hertel score was 4.83 (SD = 0.75). Regression analysis of change in volume versus follow-up time to imaging indicates that follow-up time to imaging has little effect on change in volume (R = - 0.2), and overall mean maximal septal deviation toward the operative side was - 0.5 mm. Negative values were attributed to deviation away form the operative site. A significant correlation was demonstrated between change in orbital volume and septal deviation distance site (R = 0.66), as well as between change in orbital volume and septal deviation angle (R = 0.67). Greater volume changes were associated with greater degree of septal deviation away from the surgical site, whereas smaller volume changes were associated with greater degree of septal deviation toward the surgical site. Conclusion A straightforward, semi-automated segmenting technique for measuring change in volume following endoscopic orbital decompression is described. This method proved useful in determining that a mean increase of approximately 6 cm in volume was achieved in this group of patients undergoing medial and inferior orbital decompression. Septal deviation appears to have an effect on the surgical outcome and should be considered during operative planning.

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