Use of antimüllerian hormone to predict the menopausal transition in HIV-infected women

Rebecca Scherzer, Ruth M. Greenblatt, Zaher O. Merhi, Seble Kassaye, Geralyn Lambert-Messerlian, Pauline M. Maki, Kerry J. Murphy, Roksana Karim, Peter Bacchetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background HIV infection has been associated with early menopausal onset, which may have adverse long-term health consequences. Antimüllerian hormone, a biomarker of ovarian reserve and gonadal aging, is reduced in HIV-infected women. Objective We sought to assess the relationship of antimüllerian hormone to age of menopause onset in HIV-infected women. Study Design We used antimüllerian hormone levels measured in plasma in 2461 HIV-infected participants from the Women's Interagency HIV Study to model the age at final menstrual period. Multivariable normal mixture models for censored data were used to identify factors associated with age at final menstrual period. Results Higher antimüllerian hormone at age 40 years was associated with later age at final menstrual period, even after multivariable adjustment for smoking, CD4 cell count, plasma HIV RNA, hepatitis C infection, and history of clinical AIDS. Each doubling of antimüllerian hormone was associated with a 1.5-year increase in the age at final menstrual period. Median age at final menstrual period ranged from 45 years for those in the 10th percentile of antimüllerian hormone to 52 years for those in the 90th percentile. Other factors independently associated with earlier age at final menstrual period included smoking, hepatitis C infection, higher HIV RNA levels, and history of clinical AIDS. Conclusion Antimüllerian hormone is highly predictive of age at final menstrual period in HIV-infected women. Measuring antimüllerian hormone in HIV-infected women may enable clinicians to predict risk of early menopause, and potentially implement individualized treatment plans to prevent menopause-related comorbidities and to aid in interpretation of symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46.e1-46.e11
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume216
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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HIV
Hormones
Menopause
Hepatitis C
HIV Infections
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Smoking
RNA
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Age of Onset
Comorbidity
Biomarkers
Health
Infection

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • antimüllerian hormone
  • hepatitis C virus infection
  • HIV
  • menopause
  • ovarian reserve
  • viremia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Scherzer, R., Greenblatt, R. M., Merhi, Z. O., Kassaye, S., Lambert-Messerlian, G., Maki, P. M., ... Bacchetti, P. (2017). Use of antimüllerian hormone to predict the menopausal transition in HIV-infected women. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 216(1), 46.e1-46.e11. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2016.07.048

Use of antimüllerian hormone to predict the menopausal transition in HIV-infected women. / Scherzer, Rebecca; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Merhi, Zaher O.; Kassaye, Seble; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn; Maki, Pauline M.; Murphy, Kerry J.; Karim, Roksana; Bacchetti, Peter.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 216, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 46.e1-46.e11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scherzer, R, Greenblatt, RM, Merhi, ZO, Kassaye, S, Lambert-Messerlian, G, Maki, PM, Murphy, KJ, Karim, R & Bacchetti, P 2017, 'Use of antimüllerian hormone to predict the menopausal transition in HIV-infected women', American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 216, no. 1, pp. 46.e1-46.e11. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2016.07.048
Scherzer R, Greenblatt RM, Merhi ZO, Kassaye S, Lambert-Messerlian G, Maki PM et al. Use of antimüllerian hormone to predict the menopausal transition in HIV-infected women. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2017 Jan 1;216(1):46.e1-46.e11. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2016.07.048
Scherzer, Rebecca ; Greenblatt, Ruth M. ; Merhi, Zaher O. ; Kassaye, Seble ; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn ; Maki, Pauline M. ; Murphy, Kerry J. ; Karim, Roksana ; Bacchetti, Peter. / Use of antimüllerian hormone to predict the menopausal transition in HIV-infected women. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2017 ; Vol. 216, No. 1. pp. 46.e1-46.e11.
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title = "Use of antim{\"u}llerian hormone to predict the menopausal transition in HIV-infected women",
abstract = "Background HIV infection has been associated with early menopausal onset, which may have adverse long-term health consequences. Antim{\"u}llerian hormone, a biomarker of ovarian reserve and gonadal aging, is reduced in HIV-infected women. Objective We sought to assess the relationship of antim{\"u}llerian hormone to age of menopause onset in HIV-infected women. Study Design We used antim{\"u}llerian hormone levels measured in plasma in 2461 HIV-infected participants from the Women's Interagency HIV Study to model the age at final menstrual period. Multivariable normal mixture models for censored data were used to identify factors associated with age at final menstrual period. Results Higher antim{\"u}llerian hormone at age 40 years was associated with later age at final menstrual period, even after multivariable adjustment for smoking, CD4 cell count, plasma HIV RNA, hepatitis C infection, and history of clinical AIDS. Each doubling of antim{\"u}llerian hormone was associated with a 1.5-year increase in the age at final menstrual period. Median age at final menstrual period ranged from 45 years for those in the 10th percentile of antim{\"u}llerian hormone to 52 years for those in the 90th percentile. Other factors independently associated with earlier age at final menstrual period included smoking, hepatitis C infection, higher HIV RNA levels, and history of clinical AIDS. Conclusion Antim{\"u}llerian hormone is highly predictive of age at final menstrual period in HIV-infected women. Measuring antim{\"u}llerian hormone in HIV-infected women may enable clinicians to predict risk of early menopause, and potentially implement individualized treatment plans to prevent menopause-related comorbidities and to aid in interpretation of symptoms.",
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AU - Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn

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N2 - Background HIV infection has been associated with early menopausal onset, which may have adverse long-term health consequences. Antimüllerian hormone, a biomarker of ovarian reserve and gonadal aging, is reduced in HIV-infected women. Objective We sought to assess the relationship of antimüllerian hormone to age of menopause onset in HIV-infected women. Study Design We used antimüllerian hormone levels measured in plasma in 2461 HIV-infected participants from the Women's Interagency HIV Study to model the age at final menstrual period. Multivariable normal mixture models for censored data were used to identify factors associated with age at final menstrual period. Results Higher antimüllerian hormone at age 40 years was associated with later age at final menstrual period, even after multivariable adjustment for smoking, CD4 cell count, plasma HIV RNA, hepatitis C infection, and history of clinical AIDS. Each doubling of antimüllerian hormone was associated with a 1.5-year increase in the age at final menstrual period. Median age at final menstrual period ranged from 45 years for those in the 10th percentile of antimüllerian hormone to 52 years for those in the 90th percentile. Other factors independently associated with earlier age at final menstrual period included smoking, hepatitis C infection, higher HIV RNA levels, and history of clinical AIDS. Conclusion Antimüllerian hormone is highly predictive of age at final menstrual period in HIV-infected women. Measuring antimüllerian hormone in HIV-infected women may enable clinicians to predict risk of early menopause, and potentially implement individualized treatment plans to prevent menopause-related comorbidities and to aid in interpretation of symptoms.

AB - Background HIV infection has been associated with early menopausal onset, which may have adverse long-term health consequences. Antimüllerian hormone, a biomarker of ovarian reserve and gonadal aging, is reduced in HIV-infected women. Objective We sought to assess the relationship of antimüllerian hormone to age of menopause onset in HIV-infected women. Study Design We used antimüllerian hormone levels measured in plasma in 2461 HIV-infected participants from the Women's Interagency HIV Study to model the age at final menstrual period. Multivariable normal mixture models for censored data were used to identify factors associated with age at final menstrual period. Results Higher antimüllerian hormone at age 40 years was associated with later age at final menstrual period, even after multivariable adjustment for smoking, CD4 cell count, plasma HIV RNA, hepatitis C infection, and history of clinical AIDS. Each doubling of antimüllerian hormone was associated with a 1.5-year increase in the age at final menstrual period. Median age at final menstrual period ranged from 45 years for those in the 10th percentile of antimüllerian hormone to 52 years for those in the 90th percentile. Other factors independently associated with earlier age at final menstrual period included smoking, hepatitis C infection, higher HIV RNA levels, and history of clinical AIDS. Conclusion Antimüllerian hormone is highly predictive of age at final menstrual period in HIV-infected women. Measuring antimüllerian hormone in HIV-infected women may enable clinicians to predict risk of early menopause, and potentially implement individualized treatment plans to prevent menopause-related comorbidities and to aid in interpretation of symptoms.

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