Upright posture and postprandial hypotension in elderly persons

M. S. Maurer, W. Karmally, H. Rivadeneira, Michael K. Parides, D. M. Bloomfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Syncope and falls are common in elderly persons and often result from the interaction of multiple clinical abnormalities. Both orthostatic hypotension and postprandial hypotension increase in prevalence with age. Objective: To determine whether meal ingestion enhances orthostatic hypotension in elderly persons. Design: Controlled paired comparison. Setting: Clinical research center. Patients: 50 functionally independent elderly persons recruited from local senior centers (n = 47) and from patients hospitalized with an unexplained fall or syncope (n = 3) (mean age, 78 years [range, 61 to 96 years]). Twenty-five participants (50%) were taking antihypertensive medication. Measurements: Sequential head-up tilt-table testing at 60 degrees was performed before and 30 minutes after ingestion of a standardized warm liquid meal that was high in carbohydrates. Heart rate and blood pressure were continuously monitored. Results: Meal ingestion (P < 0.01) and time spent upright (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure, but no significant interaction was found between meal ingestion and time spent upright (P > 0.2). These findings suggest that the association between meal ingestion and head-up tilt-table testing were additive and not synergistic. However, the proportion of participants with symptomatic hypotension increased during head-up tilt-table testing after meal ingestion (i2% during preprandial testing and 22% during postprandial testing). Symptomatic hypotension tended to occur more often and sooner after meal ingestion than before meal ingestion (P = 0.03). Conclusions: Meal ingestion and head-up tilt-table testing are associated with increasing occurrences of symptomatic hypotension. After meal ingestion and head-up tilt-table testing, 22% of functionally independent elderly persons had symptomatic hypotension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)533-536
Number of pages4
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume133
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 3 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Posture
Hypotension
Meals
Eating
Head
Orthostatic Hypotension
Syncope
Senior Centers
Multiple Abnormalities
Matched-Pair Analysis
Antihypertensive Agents
Heart Rate
Carbohydrates
Blood Pressure
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Upright posture and postprandial hypotension in elderly persons. / Maurer, M. S.; Karmally, W.; Rivadeneira, H.; Parides, Michael K.; Bloomfield, D. M.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 133, No. 7, 03.10.2000, p. 533-536.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maurer, M. S. ; Karmally, W. ; Rivadeneira, H. ; Parides, Michael K. ; Bloomfield, D. M. / Upright posture and postprandial hypotension in elderly persons. In: Annals of Internal Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 133, No. 7. pp. 533-536.
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