Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Intravenous Catheters to Reduce Central Venous Catheter Use on the Inpatient Medical Ward

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The traditional technique of placing a peripheral intravenous (IV) catheter is successful in most cases on inpatient wards. However, when the traditional method fails, a central venous catheter may be placed to maintain IV access. These catheters are associated with risks including central line-associated bloodstream infection. Methods: We evaluated the effectiveness and acceptability of an ultrasound-guided peripheral IV service to reduce the number of newly placed central venous catheters on an inpatient ward. Central venous catheters were counted daily on intervention and control wards using a standard protocol, and rates of newly placed catheters were compared using a Poisson regression model. Nurses were surveyed to assess acceptability and perceived benefit. Results: We found a reduction in the rate of newly placed central venous catheters on the intervention unit compared with the control unit at 90 days: mean 0.47 versus 0.67 newly placed central venous catheters/day, but the difference was not significant (P =.08). Nurses were in favor of the ultrasound-guided IV service, with perceived benefit to their patients. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided peripheral IV might reduce unnecessary central venous catheters on general inpatient wards. A portable ultrasound used for this purpose was found to be acceptable by nursing staff.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-32
Number of pages3
JournalQuality Management in Health Care
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Central Venous Catheters
Inpatients
nurse
Catheters
nursing staff
regression
Nurses
Patients' Rooms
Nursing Staff
Infection

Keywords

  • central line-associated bloodstream infection
  • central venous catheter
  • ultrasound
  • ultrasound-guided peripheral IV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy
  • Care Planning

Cite this

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title = "Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Intravenous Catheters to Reduce Central Venous Catheter Use on the Inpatient Medical Ward",
abstract = "Purpose: The traditional technique of placing a peripheral intravenous (IV) catheter is successful in most cases on inpatient wards. However, when the traditional method fails, a central venous catheter may be placed to maintain IV access. These catheters are associated with risks including central line-associated bloodstream infection. Methods: We evaluated the effectiveness and acceptability of an ultrasound-guided peripheral IV service to reduce the number of newly placed central venous catheters on an inpatient ward. Central venous catheters were counted daily on intervention and control wards using a standard protocol, and rates of newly placed catheters were compared using a Poisson regression model. Nurses were surveyed to assess acceptability and perceived benefit. Results: We found a reduction in the rate of newly placed central venous catheters on the intervention unit compared with the control unit at 90 days: mean 0.47 versus 0.67 newly placed central venous catheters/day, but the difference was not significant (P =.08). Nurses were in favor of the ultrasound-guided IV service, with perceived benefit to their patients. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided peripheral IV might reduce unnecessary central venous catheters on general inpatient wards. A portable ultrasound used for this purpose was found to be acceptable by nursing staff.",
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N2 - Purpose: The traditional technique of placing a peripheral intravenous (IV) catheter is successful in most cases on inpatient wards. However, when the traditional method fails, a central venous catheter may be placed to maintain IV access. These catheters are associated with risks including central line-associated bloodstream infection. Methods: We evaluated the effectiveness and acceptability of an ultrasound-guided peripheral IV service to reduce the number of newly placed central venous catheters on an inpatient ward. Central venous catheters were counted daily on intervention and control wards using a standard protocol, and rates of newly placed catheters were compared using a Poisson regression model. Nurses were surveyed to assess acceptability and perceived benefit. Results: We found a reduction in the rate of newly placed central venous catheters on the intervention unit compared with the control unit at 90 days: mean 0.47 versus 0.67 newly placed central venous catheters/day, but the difference was not significant (P =.08). Nurses were in favor of the ultrasound-guided IV service, with perceived benefit to their patients. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided peripheral IV might reduce unnecessary central venous catheters on general inpatient wards. A portable ultrasound used for this purpose was found to be acceptable by nursing staff.

AB - Purpose: The traditional technique of placing a peripheral intravenous (IV) catheter is successful in most cases on inpatient wards. However, when the traditional method fails, a central venous catheter may be placed to maintain IV access. These catheters are associated with risks including central line-associated bloodstream infection. Methods: We evaluated the effectiveness and acceptability of an ultrasound-guided peripheral IV service to reduce the number of newly placed central venous catheters on an inpatient ward. Central venous catheters were counted daily on intervention and control wards using a standard protocol, and rates of newly placed catheters were compared using a Poisson regression model. Nurses were surveyed to assess acceptability and perceived benefit. Results: We found a reduction in the rate of newly placed central venous catheters on the intervention unit compared with the control unit at 90 days: mean 0.47 versus 0.67 newly placed central venous catheters/day, but the difference was not significant (P =.08). Nurses were in favor of the ultrasound-guided IV service, with perceived benefit to their patients. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided peripheral IV might reduce unnecessary central venous catheters on general inpatient wards. A portable ultrasound used for this purpose was found to be acceptable by nursing staff.

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