Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C in Patients Receiving Opioid Agonist Therapy

A Review of Best Practice

Brianna L. Norton, Matthew J. Akiyama, Philippe J. Zamor, Alain H. Litwin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Injection drug use is the most common transmission route for hepatitis C. High rates of infection are observed among individuals on opioid agonist therapy. Although people who inject drugs carry the highest burden, few have initiated treatment. We present a comprehensive review of the evidence on the efficacy of HCV medications, drug–drug interactions, and barriers to and models of care. Studies have demonstrated comparable efficacy for individuals who are on opioid agonist therapy compared with those who are not. We propose that a strategy of treatment and cure-as-prevention is imperative in this population to curb the hepatitis C epidemic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-370
Number of pages24
JournalInfectious Disease Clinics of North America
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

Fingerprint

Chronic Hepatitis C
Practice Guidelines
Opioid Analgesics
Hepatitis C
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Injections
Infection
Population

Keywords

  • Best practice
  • Direct acting antivirals
  • Drug-drug interactions
  • Hepatitis C virus
  • Opioid agonist therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C in Patients Receiving Opioid Agonist Therapy : A Review of Best Practice. / Norton, Brianna L.; Akiyama, Matthew J.; Zamor, Philippe J.; Litwin, Alain H.

In: Infectious Disease Clinics of North America, Vol. 32, No. 2, 01.06.2018, p. 347-370.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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