Toxoplasma gondii: From animals to humans

Astrid M. Tenter, Anja R. Heckeroth, Louis M. Weiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1882 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Toxoplasmosis is one of the more common parasitic zoonoses world-wide. Its causative agent, Toxoplasma gondii, is a facultatively heteroxenous, polyxenous protozoon that has developed several potential routes of transmission within and between different host species. If first contracted during pregnancy, T. gondii may be transmitted vertically by tachyzoites that are passed to the foetus via the placenta. Horizontal transmission of T. gondii may involve three life-cycle stages, i.e. ingesting infectious oocysts from the environment or ingesting tissue cysts or tachyzoites which are contained in meat or primary offal (viscera) of many different animals. Transmission may also occur via tachyzoites contained in blood products, tissue transplants, or unpasteurised milk. However, it is not known which of these routes is more important epidemiologically. In the past, the consumption of raw or undercooked meat, in particular of pigs and sheep, has been regarded as a major route of transmission to humans. However, recent studies showed that the prevalence of T. gondii in meat-producing animals decreased considerably over the past 20 years in areas with intensive farm management. For example, in several countries of the European Union prevalences of T. gondii in fattening pigs are now <1%. Considering these data it is unlikely that pork is still a major source of infection for humans in these countries. However, it is likely that the major routes of transmission are different in human populations with differences in culture and eating habits. In the Americas, recent outbreaks of acute toxoplasmosis in humans have been associated with oocyst contamination of the environment. Therefore, future epidemiological studies on T. gondii infections should consider the role of oocysts as potential sources of infection for humans, and methods to monitor these are currently being developed. This review presents recent epidemiological data on T. gondii, hypotheses on the major routes of transmission to humans in different populations, and preventive measures that may reduce the risk of contracting a primary infection during pregnancy. Copyright (C) 2000 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1217-1258
Number of pages42
JournalInternational Journal for Parasitology
Volume30
Issue number12-13
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Toxoplasma
Oocysts
Toxoplasmosis
Meat
Swine
Infection
Pregnancy
Viscera
Zoonoses
Feeding Behavior
European Union
Life Cycle Stages
Placenta
Population
Disease Outbreaks
Cysts
Epidemiologic Studies
Sheep
Milk
Fetus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Toxoplasma gondii : From animals to humans. / Tenter, Astrid M.; Heckeroth, Anja R.; Weiss, Louis M.

In: International Journal for Parasitology, Vol. 30, No. 12-13, 2000, p. 1217-1258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tenter, Astrid M. ; Heckeroth, Anja R. ; Weiss, Louis M. / Toxoplasma gondii : From animals to humans. In: International Journal for Parasitology. 2000 ; Vol. 30, No. 12-13. pp. 1217-1258.
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