Three-Dimensional Printed Anatomic Models Derived From Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data: Current State and Image Acquisition Recommendations for Appropriate Clinical Scenarios

Varsha R. Talanki, Qi Peng, Stephanie B. Shamir, Steven H. Baete, Timothy Q. Duong, Nicole Wake

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) printing technologies have been increasingly utilized in medicine over the past several years and can greatly facilitate surgical planning thereby improving patient outcomes. Although still much less utilized compared to computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is gaining traction in medical 3D printing. The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) to determine the prevalence in the existing literature of using MRI to create 3D printed anatomic models for surgical planning and 2) to provide image acquisition recommendations for appropriate clinical scenarios where MRI is the most suitable imaging modality. The workflow for creating 3D printed anatomic models from medical imaging data is complex and involves image segmentation of the regions of interest and conversion of that data into 3D surface meshes, which are compatible with printing technologies. CT is most commonly used to create 3D printed anatomic models due to the high image quality and relative ease of performing image segmentation from CT data. As compared to CT datasets, 3D printing using MRI data offers advantages since it provides exquisite soft tissue contrast needed for accurate organ segmentation and it does not expose patients to unnecessary ionizing radiation. MRI, however, often requires complicated imaging techniques and time-consuming postprocessing procedures to generate high-resolution 3D anatomic models needed for 3D printing. Despite these challenges, 3D modeling and printing from MRI data holds great clinical promises thanks to emerging innovations in both advanced MRI imaging and postprocessing techniques. Evidence Level: 2. Technical Efficatcy: 5.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • 3D printing
  • cardiovascular surgery
  • congenital heart disease
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • neurosurgery
  • surgical planning
  • urologic surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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