The use of ethnographic interviewing to inform questionnaire construction.

Laurie J. Bauman, E. G. Adair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many researchers planning a quantitative study begin by conducting qualitative interviews to enhance their understanding of the phenomenon under study and to prepare for constructing a questionnaire. The rich insights that in-depth interviews provide into attitudes, values, and behaviors can be invaluable for survey design and measurement decisions. We incorporated a relatively unusual technique, the ethnographic interview, in developing a survey. In this paper, we describe what an ethnographic interview is, compare it to four other kinds of qualitative interviewing styles, and identify specific ways it can contribute to constructing surveys. We illustrate these points with examples from 10 ethnographic interviews that were conducted for a study of social support among inner-city mothers of children who had chronic illnesses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-23
Number of pages15
JournalHealth Education Quarterly
Volume19
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1992

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Interviews
Social Support
Chronic Disease
Mothers
Research Personnel
Surveys and Questionnaires
Ethnographic
Questionnaire
Interviewing
Conducting
Inner City
In-depth Interviews
Planning
Chronic Illness
Quantitative Study
Qualitative Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The use of ethnographic interviewing to inform questionnaire construction. / Bauman, Laurie J.; Adair, E. G.

In: Health Education Quarterly, Vol. 19, No. 1, 03.1992, p. 9-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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