The spectrum of neuropsychiatric abnormalities associated with electrical status epilepticus in sleep

Aristea S. Galanopoulou, Aviva Bojko, Fred Lado, Solomon L. Moshe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

125 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Electrical status epilepticus in sleep (ESES) is an electrographic pattern consisting of an almost continuous presence of spike-wave discharges in slow wave sleep. ESES is frequently encountered in pediatric syndromes associated with epilepsy or cognitive and language dysfunction. It can be present in various evolutionary stages of a spectrum of diseases, the prototypes of which are the 'continuous spikes and waves during slow wave sleep' syndrome (CSWS), the Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS), as well as in patients initially presenting as benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS). The purpose of this article is to review the literature data on the semiology, electrographic findings, prognosis, therapeutic options, as well as the current theories on the pathophysiology of these disorders. The frequent overlap of CSWS, LKS, and BECTS urges an increased level of awareness for the occasional transition from benign conditions such as BECTS to more devastating syndromes such as LKS and CSWS. Identification of atypical signs and symptoms, such as high discharge rates, prolonged duration of ESES, neuropsychiatric and cognitive dysfunction, lack of responsiveness to medications, and pre-existing neurologic conditions is of paramount importance in order to initiate the appropriate diagnostic measures. Prolonged and if needed repetitive sleep electroencephalographs (EEGs) are warranted for proper diagnosis. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-295
Number of pages17
JournalBrain and Development
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 14 2000

Fingerprint

Status Epilepticus
Sleep
Landau-Kleffner Syndrome
Rolandic Epilepsy
Preexisting Condition Coverage
Nervous System
Signs and Symptoms
Epilepsy
Language
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • Antiepileptics
  • Aphasia
  • Electrocorticography
  • Electroencephalography
  • Magnetoencephalography
  • Multiple subpial transections
  • Seizure
  • Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neurology

Cite this

The spectrum of neuropsychiatric abnormalities associated with electrical status epilepticus in sleep. / Galanopoulou, Aristea S.; Bojko, Aviva; Lado, Fred; Moshe, Solomon L.

In: Brain and Development, Vol. 22, No. 5, 14.08.2000, p. 279-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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