The severely under-recognized public health risk of strongyloidiasis in North American cities—A One Health approach

S. Jariwala, L. Redding, D. Hewitt

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Strongyloides and other soil-transmitted helminths represent a severely under-recognized zoonotic public health risk, especially in North American cities. They are present throughout North America, including in urban areas, causing morbidity and mortality in human and non-human animals. Epidemiological “masking” of strongyloidiasis due to overlapping symptoms with other systemic diseases, including allergies, and diagnostic limitations complicate our understanding of the epidemiological extent of this disease, and auto-infection allows long-term persistence of individual infections. Zoonotic transmission and environmental transmission are critical components in the epidemiology of strongyloidiasis, and other diseases caused by soil-transmitted helminths. In this review, we bring together medical, veterinary and environmental expertise in a “One Health” context, to document and analyse this under-recognized risk. We also present implementable opportunities for action with respect to diagnostics, treatment, community engagement and land management to mitigate the impact and transmission of strongyloidiasis and other diseases caused by soil-transmitted helminths.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)579-588
Number of pages10
JournalZoonoses and Public Health
Volume64
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2017

Keywords

  • One Health
  • allergies
  • soil-transmitted helminths
  • strongyloidiasis
  • urban green space

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • veterinary(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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