The relationship between attention and gait in aging: Facts and fallacies

Roee Holtzer, Cuiling Wang, Joe Verghese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current study critically assessed the relationship between cognitive functions and gait in nondemented older adults. Quantitative measures of gait (velocity, cadence, and a coefficient of variance in stride length) were assessed in single and dual-task conditions. Three cognitive factors captured the domains of Executive Attention, Verbal IQ, and Memory. Linear regressions showed that Executive Attention was related to velocity in both walking conditions. However, Memory and Verbal IQ were also related to velocity. Memory was related to Cadence in both walking conditions. Executive Attention was related to the coefficient of variance in stride length in both walking conditions. Linear mixed effects models showed that dual-task costs were largest in velocity followed by cadence and the coefficient of variance in stride length. The relationship between cognitive functions and gait depends, in part, on the analytic approach used, gait parameters assessed, and walking condition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-80
Number of pages17
JournalMotor Control
Volume16
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2012

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Gait
Walking
Cognition
Linear Models
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Gerontology
  • Motor control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

The relationship between attention and gait in aging : Facts and fallacies. / Holtzer, Roee; Wang, Cuiling; Verghese, Joe.

In: Motor Control, Vol. 16, No. 1, 2012, p. 64-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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