The Mayo Clinic Risk Score predicts in-hospital mortality following primary angioplasty.

Sridhar Sampath Kumar, Abdissa Negassa, E. Scott Monrad, V. S. Srinivas

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The Mayo Clinic Risk Score (MCRS) is a validated numeric score that predicts outcome following primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). PURPOSE: We evaluated the ability of MCRS to risk stratify patients undergoing primary angioplasty. METHODS: Patients undergoing primary angioplasty within 6 hours of the onset of chest pain in the New York State percutaneous coronary intervention reporting system (n = 3,005) had their MCRS calculated using predictive variables: age, presence of cardiogenic shock, renal failure, class III-IV congestive heart failure, left main coronary disease and multivessel coronary disease. All patients were presumed to have intra-coronary thrombus and undergoing an urgent/emergent procedure. Based on the MCRS, patients were classified into five risk categories: very low-risk (MCRS < 5), low risk (6-8), moderate (9-11), high (12-14) and very high risk (15-25). RESULTS: The mean age of the study population was 62 years, 70% were male; stents were used in 89% and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists in 72%. The prevalence of cardiogenic shock, multivessel disease and left main disease was higher in patients with MCRS > 12. Overall in-hospital mortality following primary angioplasty was 4.7%; it was 0% in the very low-risk category, 0.9% in the low-risk category, 3.2% in the moderate-risk category, 10.7% in the high-risk category, and 25.1% in the very high-risk category (p < 0.0001). The higher-risk MCRS category predicted increased risk even when 317 (10.5%) patients with cardiogenic shock were excluded from the analysis. The overall c-statistic for the prediction of in-hospital mortality by MCRS was 0.85. CONCLUSION: Increasing MCRS predicts in-hospital mortality following primary angioplasty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)522-526
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Invasive Cardiology
Volume17
Issue number10
StatePublished - 2005

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Hospital Mortality
Angioplasty
Cardiogenic Shock
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Coronary Disease
Chest Pain

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The Mayo Clinic Risk Score predicts in-hospital mortality following primary angioplasty. / Kumar, Sridhar Sampath; Negassa, Abdissa; Monrad, E. Scott; Srinivas, V. S.

In: Journal of Invasive Cardiology, Vol. 17, No. 10, 2005, p. 522-526.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "The Mayo Clinic Risk Score predicts in-hospital mortality following primary angioplasty.",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The Mayo Clinic Risk Score (MCRS) is a validated numeric score that predicts outcome following primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). PURPOSE: We evaluated the ability of MCRS to risk stratify patients undergoing primary angioplasty. METHODS: Patients undergoing primary angioplasty within 6 hours of the onset of chest pain in the New York State percutaneous coronary intervention reporting system (n = 3,005) had their MCRS calculated using predictive variables: age, presence of cardiogenic shock, renal failure, class III-IV congestive heart failure, left main coronary disease and multivessel coronary disease. All patients were presumed to have intra-coronary thrombus and undergoing an urgent/emergent procedure. Based on the MCRS, patients were classified into five risk categories: very low-risk (MCRS < 5), low risk (6-8), moderate (9-11), high (12-14) and very high risk (15-25). RESULTS: The mean age of the study population was 62 years, 70{\%} were male; stents were used in 89{\%} and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists in 72{\%}. The prevalence of cardiogenic shock, multivessel disease and left main disease was higher in patients with MCRS > 12. Overall in-hospital mortality following primary angioplasty was 4.7{\%}; it was 0{\%} in the very low-risk category, 0.9{\%} in the low-risk category, 3.2{\%} in the moderate-risk category, 10.7{\%} in the high-risk category, and 25.1{\%} in the very high-risk category (p < 0.0001). The higher-risk MCRS category predicted increased risk even when 317 (10.5{\%}) patients with cardiogenic shock were excluded from the analysis. The overall c-statistic for the prediction of in-hospital mortality by MCRS was 0.85. CONCLUSION: Increasing MCRS predicts in-hospital mortality following primary angioplasty.",
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N2 - BACKGROUND: The Mayo Clinic Risk Score (MCRS) is a validated numeric score that predicts outcome following primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). PURPOSE: We evaluated the ability of MCRS to risk stratify patients undergoing primary angioplasty. METHODS: Patients undergoing primary angioplasty within 6 hours of the onset of chest pain in the New York State percutaneous coronary intervention reporting system (n = 3,005) had their MCRS calculated using predictive variables: age, presence of cardiogenic shock, renal failure, class III-IV congestive heart failure, left main coronary disease and multivessel coronary disease. All patients were presumed to have intra-coronary thrombus and undergoing an urgent/emergent procedure. Based on the MCRS, patients were classified into five risk categories: very low-risk (MCRS < 5), low risk (6-8), moderate (9-11), high (12-14) and very high risk (15-25). RESULTS: The mean age of the study population was 62 years, 70% were male; stents were used in 89% and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists in 72%. The prevalence of cardiogenic shock, multivessel disease and left main disease was higher in patients with MCRS > 12. Overall in-hospital mortality following primary angioplasty was 4.7%; it was 0% in the very low-risk category, 0.9% in the low-risk category, 3.2% in the moderate-risk category, 10.7% in the high-risk category, and 25.1% in the very high-risk category (p < 0.0001). The higher-risk MCRS category predicted increased risk even when 317 (10.5%) patients with cardiogenic shock were excluded from the analysis. The overall c-statistic for the prediction of in-hospital mortality by MCRS was 0.85. CONCLUSION: Increasing MCRS predicts in-hospital mortality following primary angioplasty.

AB - BACKGROUND: The Mayo Clinic Risk Score (MCRS) is a validated numeric score that predicts outcome following primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). PURPOSE: We evaluated the ability of MCRS to risk stratify patients undergoing primary angioplasty. METHODS: Patients undergoing primary angioplasty within 6 hours of the onset of chest pain in the New York State percutaneous coronary intervention reporting system (n = 3,005) had their MCRS calculated using predictive variables: age, presence of cardiogenic shock, renal failure, class III-IV congestive heart failure, left main coronary disease and multivessel coronary disease. All patients were presumed to have intra-coronary thrombus and undergoing an urgent/emergent procedure. Based on the MCRS, patients were classified into five risk categories: very low-risk (MCRS < 5), low risk (6-8), moderate (9-11), high (12-14) and very high risk (15-25). RESULTS: The mean age of the study population was 62 years, 70% were male; stents were used in 89% and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists in 72%. The prevalence of cardiogenic shock, multivessel disease and left main disease was higher in patients with MCRS > 12. Overall in-hospital mortality following primary angioplasty was 4.7%; it was 0% in the very low-risk category, 0.9% in the low-risk category, 3.2% in the moderate-risk category, 10.7% in the high-risk category, and 25.1% in the very high-risk category (p < 0.0001). The higher-risk MCRS category predicted increased risk even when 317 (10.5%) patients with cardiogenic shock were excluded from the analysis. The overall c-statistic for the prediction of in-hospital mortality by MCRS was 0.85. CONCLUSION: Increasing MCRS predicts in-hospital mortality following primary angioplasty.

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