The interface of depression and dementia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The interface of depression and dementia is an enduring, difficult problem in psychogeriatrics. Cognitive impairment is one of the secondary criteria for major depression; and major depression may well be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. The influence of vascular disease on dementia and late-onset major depression is also compelling. However, depressive symptoms more often appear to be a prodrome of Alzheimer's disease or a complication of vascular dementia. Major depression and stroke may both accelerate the dementia process, but seem unlikely on the basis of single episodes to be a sufficient cause of dementia. The heterogeneity of signs, symptoms and neuropathology in both depression and dementia remain substantial obstacles to a clear understanding of the interface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-369
Number of pages3
JournalCurrent Opinion in Psychiatry
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

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Dementia
Depression
Alzheimer Disease
Geriatric Psychiatry
Vascular Dementia
Vascular Diseases
Signs and Symptoms
Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The interface of depression and dementia. / Kennedy, Gary J.; Scalmati, Alessandra.

In: Current Opinion in Psychiatry, Vol. 14, No. 4, 2001, p. 367-369.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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