The impact of HIV status, HIV disease progression, and post-traumatic stress symptoms on the health-related quality of life of Rwandan women genocide survivors

Tracy L. Gard, Donald R. Hoover, Qiuhu Shi, Mardge H. Cohen, Eugene Mutimura, Adebola A. Adedimeji, Kathryn Anastos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We examined whether established associations between HIV disease and HIV disease progression on worse health-related quality of life (HQOL) were applicable to women with severe trauma histories, in this case Rwandan women genocide survivors, the majority of whom were HIV-infected. Additionally, this study attempted to clarify whether post-traumatic stress symptoms were uniquely associated with HQOL or confounded with depression. Methods: The Rwandan Women's Interassociation Study and Assessment was a longitudinal prospective study of HIV-infected and uninfected women. At study entry, 922 women (705 HIV+ and 217 HIV-) completed measures of symptoms of post-traumatic stress and HQOL as well as other demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics. Results: Even after controlling for potential confounders and mediators, HIV+ women, in particular those with the lowest CD4 counts, scored significantly worse on HQOL and overall quality of life (QOL) than did HIV- women. Even after controlling for depression and HIV disease progression, women with more post-traumatic stress symptoms scored worse on HQOL and overall QOL than women with fewer post-traumatic stress symptoms. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that post-traumatic stress symptoms were independently associated with HQOL and overall QOL, independent of depression and other confounders or potential mediators. Future research should examine whether the long-term impact of treatment on physical and psychological symptoms of HIV and post-traumatic stress symptoms would generate improvement in HQOL.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2073-2084
Number of pages12
JournalQuality of Life Research
Volume22
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013

Fingerprint

Genocide
Survivors
Disease Progression
Quality of Life
HIV
CD4 Lymphocyte Count

Keywords

  • HIV
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Quality of life
  • Rwanda
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The impact of HIV status, HIV disease progression, and post-traumatic stress symptoms on the health-related quality of life of Rwandan women genocide survivors. / Gard, Tracy L.; Hoover, Donald R.; Shi, Qiuhu; Cohen, Mardge H.; Mutimura, Eugene; Adedimeji, Adebola A.; Anastos, Kathryn.

In: Quality of Life Research, Vol. 22, No. 8, 10.2013, p. 2073-2084.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0587b41838ee4d168b555287e3b95dca,
title = "The impact of HIV status, HIV disease progression, and post-traumatic stress symptoms on the health-related quality of life of Rwandan women genocide survivors",
abstract = "Purpose: We examined whether established associations between HIV disease and HIV disease progression on worse health-related quality of life (HQOL) were applicable to women with severe trauma histories, in this case Rwandan women genocide survivors, the majority of whom were HIV-infected. Additionally, this study attempted to clarify whether post-traumatic stress symptoms were uniquely associated with HQOL or confounded with depression. Methods: The Rwandan Women's Interassociation Study and Assessment was a longitudinal prospective study of HIV-infected and uninfected women. At study entry, 922 women (705 HIV+ and 217 HIV-) completed measures of symptoms of post-traumatic stress and HQOL as well as other demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics. Results: Even after controlling for potential confounders and mediators, HIV+ women, in particular those with the lowest CD4 counts, scored significantly worse on HQOL and overall quality of life (QOL) than did HIV- women. Even after controlling for depression and HIV disease progression, women with more post-traumatic stress symptoms scored worse on HQOL and overall QOL than women with fewer post-traumatic stress symptoms. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that post-traumatic stress symptoms were independently associated with HQOL and overall QOL, independent of depression and other confounders or potential mediators. Future research should examine whether the long-term impact of treatment on physical and psychological symptoms of HIV and post-traumatic stress symptoms would generate improvement in HQOL.",
keywords = "HIV, Post-traumatic stress disorder, Quality of life, Rwanda, Women",
author = "Gard, {Tracy L.} and Hoover, {Donald R.} and Qiuhu Shi and Cohen, {Mardge H.} and Eugene Mutimura and Adedimeji, {Adebola A.} and Kathryn Anastos",
year = "2013",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1007/s11136-012-0328-y",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "2073--2084",
journal = "Quality of Life Research",
issn = "0962-9343",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of HIV status, HIV disease progression, and post-traumatic stress symptoms on the health-related quality of life of Rwandan women genocide survivors

AU - Gard, Tracy L.

AU - Hoover, Donald R.

AU - Shi, Qiuhu

AU - Cohen, Mardge H.

AU - Mutimura, Eugene

AU - Adedimeji, Adebola A.

AU - Anastos, Kathryn

PY - 2013/10

Y1 - 2013/10

N2 - Purpose: We examined whether established associations between HIV disease and HIV disease progression on worse health-related quality of life (HQOL) were applicable to women with severe trauma histories, in this case Rwandan women genocide survivors, the majority of whom were HIV-infected. Additionally, this study attempted to clarify whether post-traumatic stress symptoms were uniquely associated with HQOL or confounded with depression. Methods: The Rwandan Women's Interassociation Study and Assessment was a longitudinal prospective study of HIV-infected and uninfected women. At study entry, 922 women (705 HIV+ and 217 HIV-) completed measures of symptoms of post-traumatic stress and HQOL as well as other demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics. Results: Even after controlling for potential confounders and mediators, HIV+ women, in particular those with the lowest CD4 counts, scored significantly worse on HQOL and overall quality of life (QOL) than did HIV- women. Even after controlling for depression and HIV disease progression, women with more post-traumatic stress symptoms scored worse on HQOL and overall QOL than women with fewer post-traumatic stress symptoms. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that post-traumatic stress symptoms were independently associated with HQOL and overall QOL, independent of depression and other confounders or potential mediators. Future research should examine whether the long-term impact of treatment on physical and psychological symptoms of HIV and post-traumatic stress symptoms would generate improvement in HQOL.

AB - Purpose: We examined whether established associations between HIV disease and HIV disease progression on worse health-related quality of life (HQOL) were applicable to women with severe trauma histories, in this case Rwandan women genocide survivors, the majority of whom were HIV-infected. Additionally, this study attempted to clarify whether post-traumatic stress symptoms were uniquely associated with HQOL or confounded with depression. Methods: The Rwandan Women's Interassociation Study and Assessment was a longitudinal prospective study of HIV-infected and uninfected women. At study entry, 922 women (705 HIV+ and 217 HIV-) completed measures of symptoms of post-traumatic stress and HQOL as well as other demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics. Results: Even after controlling for potential confounders and mediators, HIV+ women, in particular those with the lowest CD4 counts, scored significantly worse on HQOL and overall quality of life (QOL) than did HIV- women. Even after controlling for depression and HIV disease progression, women with more post-traumatic stress symptoms scored worse on HQOL and overall QOL than women with fewer post-traumatic stress symptoms. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that post-traumatic stress symptoms were independently associated with HQOL and overall QOL, independent of depression and other confounders or potential mediators. Future research should examine whether the long-term impact of treatment on physical and psychological symptoms of HIV and post-traumatic stress symptoms would generate improvement in HQOL.

KW - HIV

KW - Post-traumatic stress disorder

KW - Quality of life

KW - Rwanda

KW - Women

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84889090420&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84889090420&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11136-012-0328-y

DO - 10.1007/s11136-012-0328-y

M3 - Article

C2 - 23271207

AN - SCOPUS:84889090420

VL - 22

SP - 2073

EP - 2084

JO - Quality of Life Research

JF - Quality of Life Research

SN - 0962-9343

IS - 8

ER -