The Effect of Vibration on Pain During Intravenous Injection of Propofol: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Lyahn K. Hwang, David W. Nash, Adam Yedlin, Nicolas Greige, Jessie Larios-Valencia, Curtis Choice, Aravind Pothula

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE: Pain is a common side effect of intravenous injection of propofol. We conducted a randomized, prospective, single-blinded controlled trial to assess the efficacy of vibration analgesia on pain during propofol infusion in ambulatory surgery. METHODS: After institutional review board approval, 100 patients undergoing elective ambulatory surgery with general anesthesia were randomized into 2 groups. A control group (n = 50) consisted of patients who received infusion of propofol without vibration analgesia. A treatment group (n = 50) consisted of patients who received infusion of propofol with vibration analgesia using the Buzzy device. Pain was assessed using a 4-point pain manifestation scale scored by 2 independent, blinded observers. RESULTS: Participants in the treatment group with vibration analgesia were 0.47 times less likely (95% confidence interval, 0.24-0.94; P = 0.03) to experience any pain than the control group. The median summative pain score in the treatment group was significantly less than that of the control group [1 (interquartile range, 1-2) vs 2 (interquartile range, 2-4); P < 0.01] among participants who experienced any pain. Agreement between the 2 blinded observers regarding pain scores was excellent with κw = 0.82 (P < 0.001). Age, sex, body mass index, needle location or size, and medication doses did not differ significantly between the 2 groups. CONCLUSION: Vibration analgesia is an effective, low-risk modality that reduces the pain of intravenous propofol injection in general anesthesia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S36-S39
JournalAnnals of Plastic Surgery
Volume87
Issue number1s Suppl 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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