The effect of lipoproteins on human glioblastoma growth in vitro

Joseph R. Moskal, Mark Sinnett, Paul L. Kornblith, Patrick A. LaSala, Daniel M. Levine, Thomas S. Parker, Harry Lander

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Experiments were performed using an established human glioblastoma cell line to determine the effect of lipoproteins on regulating their growth. It was found that synthetic and natural human high density lipoproteins (HDL) were effective in inhibiting tumor cell growth in a nontoxic, dose-dependent manner, and that the LD50 was 10-fold lower than that for normal rat astrocytes grown under identical conditions. In the presence of the antioxidant, glutathione, essentially all of the growth-inhibiting properties of HDL could be reversed suggesting that oxidized lipids from the HDL interacting with the plasma membranes of the glioblastoma cells were responsible for the growth-inhibiting effect observed. The markedly lower concentration of HDL required to inhibit glioblastoma cells in culture compared to normal astrocytes suggested that the mechanism of HDL-induced inhibition may be important for tumor growth in vivo. One possible mechanism under investigation is the possibility of HDL modulation of a membrane-associated, tumor-specific phosphatase.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)169-181
Number of pages13
JournalMolecular and Chemical Neuropathology
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

HDL Lipoproteins
Glioblastoma
Lipoproteins
Growth
Astrocytes
Neoplasms
Lethal Dose 50
Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases
Glutathione
In Vitro Techniques
Cell Culture Techniques
Antioxidants
Cell Membrane
Lipids
Cell Line
Membranes

Keywords

  • autocrine growth control
  • glioblastoma growth regulation
  • high density
  • Lipoproteins
  • membrane-membrane interactions
  • receptor-mediated processes
  • regulation of cell-cycle by phosphatases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Moskal, J. R., Sinnett, M., Kornblith, P. L., LaSala, P. A., Levine, D. M., Parker, T. S., & Lander, H. (1992). The effect of lipoproteins on human glioblastoma growth in vitro. Molecular and Chemical Neuropathology, 17(2), 169-181. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03159990

The effect of lipoproteins on human glioblastoma growth in vitro. / Moskal, Joseph R.; Sinnett, Mark; Kornblith, Paul L.; LaSala, Patrick A.; Levine, Daniel M.; Parker, Thomas S.; Lander, Harry.

In: Molecular and Chemical Neuropathology, Vol. 17, No. 2, 10.1992, p. 169-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moskal, JR, Sinnett, M, Kornblith, PL, LaSala, PA, Levine, DM, Parker, TS & Lander, H 1992, 'The effect of lipoproteins on human glioblastoma growth in vitro', Molecular and Chemical Neuropathology, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 169-181. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03159990
Moskal, Joseph R. ; Sinnett, Mark ; Kornblith, Paul L. ; LaSala, Patrick A. ; Levine, Daniel M. ; Parker, Thomas S. ; Lander, Harry. / The effect of lipoproteins on human glioblastoma growth in vitro. In: Molecular and Chemical Neuropathology. 1992 ; Vol. 17, No. 2. pp. 169-181.
@article{f0a892576d514b56a94902e9b0c76031,
title = "The effect of lipoproteins on human glioblastoma growth in vitro",
abstract = "Experiments were performed using an established human glioblastoma cell line to determine the effect of lipoproteins on regulating their growth. It was found that synthetic and natural human high density lipoproteins (HDL) were effective in inhibiting tumor cell growth in a nontoxic, dose-dependent manner, and that the LD50 was 10-fold lower than that for normal rat astrocytes grown under identical conditions. In the presence of the antioxidant, glutathione, essentially all of the growth-inhibiting properties of HDL could be reversed suggesting that oxidized lipids from the HDL interacting with the plasma membranes of the glioblastoma cells were responsible for the growth-inhibiting effect observed. The markedly lower concentration of HDL required to inhibit glioblastoma cells in culture compared to normal astrocytes suggested that the mechanism of HDL-induced inhibition may be important for tumor growth in vivo. One possible mechanism under investigation is the possibility of HDL modulation of a membrane-associated, tumor-specific phosphatase.",
keywords = "autocrine growth control, glioblastoma growth regulation, high density, Lipoproteins, membrane-membrane interactions, receptor-mediated processes, regulation of cell-cycle by phosphatases",
author = "Moskal, {Joseph R.} and Mark Sinnett and Kornblith, {Paul L.} and LaSala, {Patrick A.} and Levine, {Daniel M.} and Parker, {Thomas S.} and Harry Lander",
year = "1992",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1007/BF03159990",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "169--181",
journal = "Journal of Molecular Neuroscience",
issn = "0895-8696",
publisher = "Humana Press",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of lipoproteins on human glioblastoma growth in vitro

AU - Moskal, Joseph R.

AU - Sinnett, Mark

AU - Kornblith, Paul L.

AU - LaSala, Patrick A.

AU - Levine, Daniel M.

AU - Parker, Thomas S.

AU - Lander, Harry

PY - 1992/10

Y1 - 1992/10

N2 - Experiments were performed using an established human glioblastoma cell line to determine the effect of lipoproteins on regulating their growth. It was found that synthetic and natural human high density lipoproteins (HDL) were effective in inhibiting tumor cell growth in a nontoxic, dose-dependent manner, and that the LD50 was 10-fold lower than that for normal rat astrocytes grown under identical conditions. In the presence of the antioxidant, glutathione, essentially all of the growth-inhibiting properties of HDL could be reversed suggesting that oxidized lipids from the HDL interacting with the plasma membranes of the glioblastoma cells were responsible for the growth-inhibiting effect observed. The markedly lower concentration of HDL required to inhibit glioblastoma cells in culture compared to normal astrocytes suggested that the mechanism of HDL-induced inhibition may be important for tumor growth in vivo. One possible mechanism under investigation is the possibility of HDL modulation of a membrane-associated, tumor-specific phosphatase.

AB - Experiments were performed using an established human glioblastoma cell line to determine the effect of lipoproteins on regulating their growth. It was found that synthetic and natural human high density lipoproteins (HDL) were effective in inhibiting tumor cell growth in a nontoxic, dose-dependent manner, and that the LD50 was 10-fold lower than that for normal rat astrocytes grown under identical conditions. In the presence of the antioxidant, glutathione, essentially all of the growth-inhibiting properties of HDL could be reversed suggesting that oxidized lipids from the HDL interacting with the plasma membranes of the glioblastoma cells were responsible for the growth-inhibiting effect observed. The markedly lower concentration of HDL required to inhibit glioblastoma cells in culture compared to normal astrocytes suggested that the mechanism of HDL-induced inhibition may be important for tumor growth in vivo. One possible mechanism under investigation is the possibility of HDL modulation of a membrane-associated, tumor-specific phosphatase.

KW - autocrine growth control

KW - glioblastoma growth regulation

KW - high density

KW - Lipoproteins

KW - membrane-membrane interactions

KW - receptor-mediated processes

KW - regulation of cell-cycle by phosphatases

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026467111&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026467111&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/BF03159990

DO - 10.1007/BF03159990

M3 - Article

C2 - 1418223

AN - SCOPUS:0026467111

VL - 17

SP - 169

EP - 181

JO - Journal of Molecular Neuroscience

JF - Journal of Molecular Neuroscience

SN - 0895-8696

IS - 2

ER -