The Caenorhabditis elegans innexin INX-3 is localized to gap junctions and is essential for embryonic development

Todd A. Starich, Agnes Miller, Rachel L. Nguyen, David H. Hall, Jocelyn E. Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Innexins are the proposed structural components of gap junctions in invertebrates. Antibodies that specifically recognize the Caenorhabditis elegans innexin protein INX-3 were generated and used to examine the patterns of inx-3 gene expression and the subcellular sites of INX-3 localization. INX-3 is first detected in two-cell embryos, concentrated at the intercellular interface, and is expressed ubiquitously throughout the cellular proliferation phase of embryogenesis. During embryonic morphogenesis, INX-3 expression becomes more restricted. Postembryonically, INX-3 is expressed transiently in several cell types, while expression in the posterior pharynx persists throughout development. Through immuno-EM techniques, INX-3 was observed at gap junctions in the adult pharynx, providing supporting evidence that innexins are components of gap junctions. An inx-3 mutant was isolated through a combined genetic and immunocytochemical screen. Homozygous inx-3 mutants exhibit defects during embryonic morphogenesis. At the comma stage of early morphogenesis, variable numbers of cells are lost from the anterior of inx-3(lw68) mutants. A range of terminal defects is seen later in embryogenesis, including localized rupture of the hypodermis, failure of the midbody to elongate properly, abnormal contacts between hypodermal cells, and failure of the pharynx to attach to the anterior of the animal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)403-417
Number of pages15
JournalDevelopmental Biology
Volume256
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2003

Fingerprint

Gap Junctions
Caenorhabditis elegans
Pharynx
Morphogenesis
Embryonic Development
Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins
Subcutaneous Tissue
Invertebrates
Rupture
Embryonic Structures
Cell Count
Cell Proliferation
Gene Expression
Antibodies

Keywords

  • C. elegans
  • Development
  • Gap junctions
  • Innexins
  • Morphogenesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

The Caenorhabditis elegans innexin INX-3 is localized to gap junctions and is essential for embryonic development. / Starich, Todd A.; Miller, Agnes; Nguyen, Rachel L.; Hall, David H.; Shaw, Jocelyn E.

In: Developmental Biology, Vol. 256, No. 2, 15.04.2003, p. 403-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Starich, Todd A. ; Miller, Agnes ; Nguyen, Rachel L. ; Hall, David H. ; Shaw, Jocelyn E. / The Caenorhabditis elegans innexin INX-3 is localized to gap junctions and is essential for embryonic development. In: Developmental Biology. 2003 ; Vol. 256, No. 2. pp. 403-417.
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