The buffering effect of hope on clinicians' behavior

A test in pediatric primary care

Howard Tennen, Michelle M. Cloutier, Dorothy B. Wakefield, Charles B. Hall, Kevin Brazil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although trait hope is thought to motivate goal-directed actions in the face of impediments, few studies have directly examined hope's role in overcoming obstacles, and none have done so while accounting for related goal constructs. We describe a study of 127 pediatric primary care providers who over the course of a year were asked to identify new cases of asthma and confirm previously diagnosed active disease by completing for each of their patients a brief survey validated for this purpose. These clinicians also completed measures of hope, self-efficacy, conscientiousness, and perceived obstacles to implementing a pediatric asthma management program. As predicted by hope theory, the agency component of hope buffered clinicians from perceived obstacles by facilitating the identification of asthma cases among high-hope clinicians in the face of obstacles. This buffering effect remained after controlling for self-efficacy and conscientiousness. We discuss the study findings in terms of current theories of goal-directed behavior and implications for delivering hope-related interventions, and we offer a testable hypothesis regarding when agency and pathways thinking facilitate goal-related behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)554-576
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Social and Clinical Psychology
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009

Fingerprint

Hope
Primary Health Care
Pediatrics
Asthma
Self Efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

The buffering effect of hope on clinicians' behavior : A test in pediatric primary care. / Tennen, Howard; Cloutier, Michelle M.; Wakefield, Dorothy B.; Hall, Charles B.; Brazil, Kevin.

In: Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 28, No. 5, 05.2009, p. 554-576.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tennen, Howard ; Cloutier, Michelle M. ; Wakefield, Dorothy B. ; Hall, Charles B. ; Brazil, Kevin. / The buffering effect of hope on clinicians' behavior : A test in pediatric primary care. In: Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology. 2009 ; Vol. 28, No. 5. pp. 554-576.
@article{a3ca2afa42a64b7998ccbd624a00cf14,
title = "The buffering effect of hope on clinicians' behavior: A test in pediatric primary care",
abstract = "Although trait hope is thought to motivate goal-directed actions in the face of impediments, few studies have directly examined hope's role in overcoming obstacles, and none have done so while accounting for related goal constructs. We describe a study of 127 pediatric primary care providers who over the course of a year were asked to identify new cases of asthma and confirm previously diagnosed active disease by completing for each of their patients a brief survey validated for this purpose. These clinicians also completed measures of hope, self-efficacy, conscientiousness, and perceived obstacles to implementing a pediatric asthma management program. As predicted by hope theory, the agency component of hope buffered clinicians from perceived obstacles by facilitating the identification of asthma cases among high-hope clinicians in the face of obstacles. This buffering effect remained after controlling for self-efficacy and conscientiousness. We discuss the study findings in terms of current theories of goal-directed behavior and implications for delivering hope-related interventions, and we offer a testable hypothesis regarding when agency and pathways thinking facilitate goal-related behavior.",
author = "Howard Tennen and Cloutier, {Michelle M.} and Wakefield, {Dorothy B.} and Hall, {Charles B.} and Kevin Brazil",
year = "2009",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1521/jscp.2009.28.5.554",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "554--576",
journal = "Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology",
issn = "0736-7236",
publisher = "Guilford Publications",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The buffering effect of hope on clinicians' behavior

T2 - A test in pediatric primary care

AU - Tennen, Howard

AU - Cloutier, Michelle M.

AU - Wakefield, Dorothy B.

AU - Hall, Charles B.

AU - Brazil, Kevin

PY - 2009/5

Y1 - 2009/5

N2 - Although trait hope is thought to motivate goal-directed actions in the face of impediments, few studies have directly examined hope's role in overcoming obstacles, and none have done so while accounting for related goal constructs. We describe a study of 127 pediatric primary care providers who over the course of a year were asked to identify new cases of asthma and confirm previously diagnosed active disease by completing for each of their patients a brief survey validated for this purpose. These clinicians also completed measures of hope, self-efficacy, conscientiousness, and perceived obstacles to implementing a pediatric asthma management program. As predicted by hope theory, the agency component of hope buffered clinicians from perceived obstacles by facilitating the identification of asthma cases among high-hope clinicians in the face of obstacles. This buffering effect remained after controlling for self-efficacy and conscientiousness. We discuss the study findings in terms of current theories of goal-directed behavior and implications for delivering hope-related interventions, and we offer a testable hypothesis regarding when agency and pathways thinking facilitate goal-related behavior.

AB - Although trait hope is thought to motivate goal-directed actions in the face of impediments, few studies have directly examined hope's role in overcoming obstacles, and none have done so while accounting for related goal constructs. We describe a study of 127 pediatric primary care providers who over the course of a year were asked to identify new cases of asthma and confirm previously diagnosed active disease by completing for each of their patients a brief survey validated for this purpose. These clinicians also completed measures of hope, self-efficacy, conscientiousness, and perceived obstacles to implementing a pediatric asthma management program. As predicted by hope theory, the agency component of hope buffered clinicians from perceived obstacles by facilitating the identification of asthma cases among high-hope clinicians in the face of obstacles. This buffering effect remained after controlling for self-efficacy and conscientiousness. We discuss the study findings in terms of current theories of goal-directed behavior and implications for delivering hope-related interventions, and we offer a testable hypothesis regarding when agency and pathways thinking facilitate goal-related behavior.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=67749108631&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=67749108631&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1521/jscp.2009.28.5.554

DO - 10.1521/jscp.2009.28.5.554

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 554

EP - 576

JO - Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology

JF - Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology

SN - 0736-7236

IS - 5

ER -