The association between seizure clustering and convulsive status epilepticus in patients with intractable complex partial seizures

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54 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: We examined the association between seizure clustering and convulsive status epilepticus (SE) in patients with intractable complex partial seizures, to identify whether patients whose seizures typically cluster are at high risk for convulsive SE (CSE). Methods: Seventy-six patients with intractable complex partial epilepsy who underwent presurgical evaluation in the Montefiore Epilepsy Management Unit from 1993 to 1997 were contacted and interviewed about typical seizure frequency and distribution and history of CSE. Seizure clustering was defined as three or more complex partial seizures within a 24-h period, with return to baseline between seizures. Results: Of the 76 patients contacted, 21 (28%) had experienced at least one episode of CSE, and 36 (47%) typically experienced clustered seizures. SE occurred in 16 (44%) of 36 patients with clustered seizures, and in five (12.5%) of 40 patients with nonclustered seizures (p < 0.002). Of 53 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, CSE occurred in 13 (50%) of 26 patients with clustered seizures, and four (14.8%) of 27 patients with nonclustered seizures (p < 0.006). Conclusions: Patients with intractable complex partial or localization-related epilepsy who typically experience seizure clustering are at a significantly higher risk for CSE than are patients with nonclustered seizures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1832-1834
Number of pages3
JournalEpilepsia
Volume40
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Keywords

  • Clustered seizures
  • Intractable epilepsy
  • Partial seizures
  • Status epilepticus
  • Temporal lobe epilepsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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