The association between ABO blood types and venous thromboembolism in individuals with a positive antiphospholipid profile is varied by sex

M. Shusterman, E. Golub, Wenzhu Bi Mowrey, Anna R. Broder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Although non-O blood type is an established risk factor for venous thromboembolism in the general population, the impact of ABO blood type (ABO) on venous thromboembolism risk in individuals with persistent antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) has not been studied. We sought to investigate the relationship between ABO and venous thromboembolism in aPL-positive individuals. We also sought to explore potential interactions between ABO and sex or race to determine whether ABO contributes to race or sex differences with respect to the development of venous thromboembolism. Methods: We identified all patients over 18 years old followed at a tertiary medical center between January 2000 and January 2015 with serological aPL criteria and ABO data. Episodes of venous thromboembolism were recorded. Logistic regression models were fitted to estimate odds ratios (ORs) of venous thromboembolism for non-O (A, B, or AB blood types) versus O blood type. Results: There were 226 patients included in the final analysis, of whom 75 (33%) had reported venous thromboembolism. In the overall sample, there was a non-significant difference between venous thromboembolism in patients with non-O blood type compared to O blood type (OR 1.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.94, 2.88; P = 0.08). Men with non-O blood type had a significantly higher risk of venous thromboembolism as compared to men with O-type blood (OR 4.94, 95% CI 1.37, 17.85; P = 0.02), but there was no significant association between ABO and venous thromboembolism among women (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.50, 1.83; P = 0.52). Conclusions: Non-O blood type may be an under-recognized risk factor for venous thromboembolism among men with persistent aPL antibodies, whereas the risk associated with non-O blood type seen in the general population may be attenuated in aPL-positive women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-326
Number of pages8
JournalLupus
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Fingerprint

Venous Thromboembolism
Antiphospholipid Antibodies
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Logistic Models
Sex Characteristics
Population

Keywords

  • ABO blood group system
  • Antiphospholipid syndrome
  • sex distribution
  • venous thrombosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

The association between ABO blood types and venous thromboembolism in individuals with a positive antiphospholipid profile is varied by sex. / Shusterman, M.; Golub, E.; Mowrey, Wenzhu Bi; Broder, Anna R.

In: Lupus, Vol. 27, No. 2, 01.02.2018, p. 319-326.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{14414d0af9d44670b204eefa9b2d64bb,
title = "The association between ABO blood types and venous thromboembolism in individuals with a positive antiphospholipid profile is varied by sex",
abstract = "Objectives: Although non-O blood type is an established risk factor for venous thromboembolism in the general population, the impact of ABO blood type (ABO) on venous thromboembolism risk in individuals with persistent antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) has not been studied. We sought to investigate the relationship between ABO and venous thromboembolism in aPL-positive individuals. We also sought to explore potential interactions between ABO and sex or race to determine whether ABO contributes to race or sex differences with respect to the development of venous thromboembolism. Methods: We identified all patients over 18 years old followed at a tertiary medical center between January 2000 and January 2015 with serological aPL criteria and ABO data. Episodes of venous thromboembolism were recorded. Logistic regression models were fitted to estimate odds ratios (ORs) of venous thromboembolism for non-O (A, B, or AB blood types) versus O blood type. Results: There were 226 patients included in the final analysis, of whom 75 (33{\%}) had reported venous thromboembolism. In the overall sample, there was a non-significant difference between venous thromboembolism in patients with non-O blood type compared to O blood type (OR 1.64, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 0.94, 2.88; P = 0.08). Men with non-O blood type had a significantly higher risk of venous thromboembolism as compared to men with O-type blood (OR 4.94, 95{\%} CI 1.37, 17.85; P = 0.02), but there was no significant association between ABO and venous thromboembolism among women (OR 0.96, 95{\%} CI 0.50, 1.83; P = 0.52). Conclusions: Non-O blood type may be an under-recognized risk factor for venous thromboembolism among men with persistent aPL antibodies, whereas the risk associated with non-O blood type seen in the general population may be attenuated in aPL-positive women.",
keywords = "ABO blood group system, Antiphospholipid syndrome, sex distribution, venous thrombosis",
author = "M. Shusterman and E. Golub and Mowrey, {Wenzhu Bi} and Broder, {Anna R.}",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0961203317721352",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
pages = "319--326",
journal = "Lupus",
issn = "0961-2033",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The association between ABO blood types and venous thromboembolism in individuals with a positive antiphospholipid profile is varied by sex

AU - Shusterman, M.

AU - Golub, E.

AU - Mowrey, Wenzhu Bi

AU - Broder, Anna R.

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - Objectives: Although non-O blood type is an established risk factor for venous thromboembolism in the general population, the impact of ABO blood type (ABO) on venous thromboembolism risk in individuals with persistent antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) has not been studied. We sought to investigate the relationship between ABO and venous thromboembolism in aPL-positive individuals. We also sought to explore potential interactions between ABO and sex or race to determine whether ABO contributes to race or sex differences with respect to the development of venous thromboembolism. Methods: We identified all patients over 18 years old followed at a tertiary medical center between January 2000 and January 2015 with serological aPL criteria and ABO data. Episodes of venous thromboembolism were recorded. Logistic regression models were fitted to estimate odds ratios (ORs) of venous thromboembolism for non-O (A, B, or AB blood types) versus O blood type. Results: There were 226 patients included in the final analysis, of whom 75 (33%) had reported venous thromboembolism. In the overall sample, there was a non-significant difference between venous thromboembolism in patients with non-O blood type compared to O blood type (OR 1.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.94, 2.88; P = 0.08). Men with non-O blood type had a significantly higher risk of venous thromboembolism as compared to men with O-type blood (OR 4.94, 95% CI 1.37, 17.85; P = 0.02), but there was no significant association between ABO and venous thromboembolism among women (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.50, 1.83; P = 0.52). Conclusions: Non-O blood type may be an under-recognized risk factor for venous thromboembolism among men with persistent aPL antibodies, whereas the risk associated with non-O blood type seen in the general population may be attenuated in aPL-positive women.

AB - Objectives: Although non-O blood type is an established risk factor for venous thromboembolism in the general population, the impact of ABO blood type (ABO) on venous thromboembolism risk in individuals with persistent antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) has not been studied. We sought to investigate the relationship between ABO and venous thromboembolism in aPL-positive individuals. We also sought to explore potential interactions between ABO and sex or race to determine whether ABO contributes to race or sex differences with respect to the development of venous thromboembolism. Methods: We identified all patients over 18 years old followed at a tertiary medical center between January 2000 and January 2015 with serological aPL criteria and ABO data. Episodes of venous thromboembolism were recorded. Logistic regression models were fitted to estimate odds ratios (ORs) of venous thromboembolism for non-O (A, B, or AB blood types) versus O blood type. Results: There were 226 patients included in the final analysis, of whom 75 (33%) had reported venous thromboembolism. In the overall sample, there was a non-significant difference between venous thromboembolism in patients with non-O blood type compared to O blood type (OR 1.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.94, 2.88; P = 0.08). Men with non-O blood type had a significantly higher risk of venous thromboembolism as compared to men with O-type blood (OR 4.94, 95% CI 1.37, 17.85; P = 0.02), but there was no significant association between ABO and venous thromboembolism among women (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.50, 1.83; P = 0.52). Conclusions: Non-O blood type may be an under-recognized risk factor for venous thromboembolism among men with persistent aPL antibodies, whereas the risk associated with non-O blood type seen in the general population may be attenuated in aPL-positive women.

KW - ABO blood group system

KW - Antiphospholipid syndrome

KW - sex distribution

KW - venous thrombosis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85039721723&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85039721723&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0961203317721352

DO - 10.1177/0961203317721352

M3 - Article

C2 - 28705035

AN - SCOPUS:85039721723

VL - 27

SP - 319

EP - 326

JO - Lupus

JF - Lupus

SN - 0961-2033

IS - 2

ER -