TC10 regulates breast cancer invasion and metastasis by controlling membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase at invadopodia

Maren Hülsemann, Colline Sanchez, Polina V. Verkhusha, Vera Des Marais, Serena P.H. Mao, Sara K. Donnelly, Jeffrey E. Segall, Louis Hodgson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

During breast cancer metastasis, cancer cell invasion is driven by actin-rich protrusions called invadopodia, which mediate the extracellular matrix degradation required for the success of the invasive cascade. In this study, we demonstrate that TC10, a member of a Cdc42 subfamily of p21 small GTPases, regulates the membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP)-driven extracellular matrix degradation at invadopodia. We show that TC10 is required for the plasma membrane surface exposure of MT1-MMP at these structures. By utilizing our Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor, we demonstrate the p190RhoGAP-dependent regulation of spatiotemporal TC10 activity at invadopodia. We identified a pathway that regulates invadopodia-associated TC10 activity and function through the activation of p190RhoGAP and the downstream interacting effector Exo70. Our findings reveal the role of a previously unknown regulator of vesicular fusion at invadopodia, TC10 GTPase, in breast cancer invasion and metastasis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1091
JournalCommunications Biology
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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