Synthetic positron emission tomography-computed tomography images for use in perceptual studies

Brian D'Alessandro, Mark Madsen, Ehsan Samei, Xiang Li, Jin Wooitan, Kevin S. Berbaum, Kevin Schartz, Robert Caldwell, Lionel S. Zuckier

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To better understand fundamental issues, perception studies of the fusion display would best be performed with a panel of lesions of variable location, size, intensity, and background. There are compelling reasons to use synthetic images that contain artificial lesions for perception research. A consideration of how to obtain this panel of lesions is the nucleus of the present review. This article is a conjoint effort of 3 groups that have joined together to review results from work that they and others have performed. The techniques we review include (1) substitution of lesions into a preexisting image matrix (either using actual prior patient-derived lesions or mathematically modeled artificial lesions), (2) addition of images (either in the attenuation-corrected image space or at an earlier stage before image reconstruction), and (3) simulation of the entire patient image. A judicious combination of the techniques discussed in this review may represent the most efficient pathway of simulating statistically varied but realistic appearing lesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)437-448
Number of pages12
JournalSeminars in nuclear medicine
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Patient Simulation
Computer-Assisted Image Processing
Research
Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Synthetic positron emission tomography-computed tomography images for use in perceptual studies. / D'Alessandro, Brian; Madsen, Mark; Samei, Ehsan; Li, Xiang; Wooitan, Jin; Berbaum, Kevin S.; Schartz, Kevin; Caldwell, Robert; Zuckier, Lionel S.

In: Seminars in nuclear medicine, Vol. 41, No. 6, 11.2011, p. 437-448.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

D'Alessandro, B, Madsen, M, Samei, E, Li, X, Wooitan, J, Berbaum, KS, Schartz, K, Caldwell, R & Zuckier, LS 2011, 'Synthetic positron emission tomography-computed tomography images for use in perceptual studies', Seminars in nuclear medicine, vol. 41, no. 6, pp. 437-448. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.semnuclmed.2011.06.007
D'Alessandro, Brian ; Madsen, Mark ; Samei, Ehsan ; Li, Xiang ; Wooitan, Jin ; Berbaum, Kevin S. ; Schartz, Kevin ; Caldwell, Robert ; Zuckier, Lionel S. / Synthetic positron emission tomography-computed tomography images for use in perceptual studies. In: Seminars in nuclear medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 41, No. 6. pp. 437-448.
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