Sympathetic activity controls fat-induced oleoylethanolamide signaling in small intestine

Jin Fu, Nicholas V. di Patrizio, Ana Guijarro, Gary J. Schwartz, Xiaosong Li, Silvana Gaetani, Giuseppe Astarita, Daniele Piomelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ingestion of dietary fat stimulates production of the small-intestinal satiety factors oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and N-palmitoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (NPPE), which reduce food intake through a combination of local (OEA) and systemic (NPPE) actions. Previous studies have shown that sympathetic innervations of the gut is necessary for duodenal infusions of fat to induce satiety, suggesting that sympathetic activity may engage small-intestinal satiety signals such as OEA and NPPE. In the present study, we show that surgical resection of the sympathetic celiac-superior mesenteric ganglion complex, which sends projections to the upper gut, abolishes feeding-induced OEA production in rat small-intestinal cells. These effects are accounted for by suppression of OEA biosynthesis, and are mimicked by administration of the selective β2-adrenergic receptor antagonist ICI-118,551. We further show that sympathetic gan-glionectomy or pharmacological blockade of β2-adrenergic receptors prevents NPPE release into the circulation. In addition, sympathetic ganglionectomy increases meal frequency and lowers satiety ratio, and these effects are corrected by pharmacological administration of OEA. The results suggest that sympathetic activity controls fat-induced satiety by enabling the coordinated production of local (OEA) and systemic (NPPE) satiety signals in the small intestine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5730-5736
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume31
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 13 2011

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Small Intestine
Fats
Eating
Ganglionectomy
Pharmacology
Adrenergic Antagonists
Dietary Fats
oleoylethanolamide
Ganglia
Abdomen
Adrenergic Receptors
Meals
phosphatidylethanolamine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Sympathetic activity controls fat-induced oleoylethanolamide signaling in small intestine. / Fu, Jin; di Patrizio, Nicholas V.; Guijarro, Ana; Schwartz, Gary J.; Li, Xiaosong; Gaetani, Silvana; Astarita, Giuseppe; Piomelli, Daniele.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 31, No. 15, 13.04.2011, p. 5730-5736.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fu, J, di Patrizio, NV, Guijarro, A, Schwartz, GJ, Li, X, Gaetani, S, Astarita, G & Piomelli, D 2011, 'Sympathetic activity controls fat-induced oleoylethanolamide signaling in small intestine', Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 31, no. 15, pp. 5730-5736. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5668-10.2011
Fu, Jin ; di Patrizio, Nicholas V. ; Guijarro, Ana ; Schwartz, Gary J. ; Li, Xiaosong ; Gaetani, Silvana ; Astarita, Giuseppe ; Piomelli, Daniele. / Sympathetic activity controls fat-induced oleoylethanolamide signaling in small intestine. In: Journal of Neuroscience. 2011 ; Vol. 31, No. 15. pp. 5730-5736.
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