Structural genomics: Beyond the Human Genome Project

Stephen K. Burley, Steven C. Almo, Jeffrey B. Bonanno, Malcolm Capel, Mark R. Chance, Terry Gaasterland, Dawei Lin, Andrej Šali, F. William Studier, Subramanyam Swaminathan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

318 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With access to whole genome sequences for various organisms and imminent completion of the Human Genome Project, the entire process of discovery in molecular and cellular biology is poised to change. Massively parallel measurement strategies promise to revolutionize how we study and ultimately understand the complex biochemical circuitry responsible for controlling normal development, physiologic homeostasis and disease processes. This information explosion is also providing the foundation for an important new initiative in structural biology. We are about to embark on a program of high-through-put X-ray crystallography aimed at developing a comprehensive mechanistic understanding of normal and abnormal human and microbial physiology at the molecular level. We present the rationale for creation of a structural genomics initiative, recount the efforts of ongoing structural genomics pilot studies, and detail the lofty goals, technical challenges and pitfalls facing structural biologists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-157
Number of pages7
JournalNature Genetics
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1999

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Human Genome Project
Genomics
Explosions
X Ray Crystallography
Cell Biology
Molecular Biology
Homeostasis
Genome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Genetics

Cite this

Burley, S. K., Almo, S. C., Bonanno, J. B., Capel, M., Chance, M. R., Gaasterland, T., ... Swaminathan, S. (1999). Structural genomics: Beyond the Human Genome Project. Nature Genetics, 23(2), 151-157. https://doi.org/10.1038/13783

Structural genomics : Beyond the Human Genome Project. / Burley, Stephen K.; Almo, Steven C.; Bonanno, Jeffrey B.; Capel, Malcolm; Chance, Mark R.; Gaasterland, Terry; Lin, Dawei; Šali, Andrej; Studier, F. William; Swaminathan, Subramanyam.

In: Nature Genetics, Vol. 23, No. 2, 10.1999, p. 151-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burley, SK, Almo, SC, Bonanno, JB, Capel, M, Chance, MR, Gaasterland, T, Lin, D, Šali, A, Studier, FW & Swaminathan, S 1999, 'Structural genomics: Beyond the Human Genome Project', Nature Genetics, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 151-157. https://doi.org/10.1038/13783
Burley SK, Almo SC, Bonanno JB, Capel M, Chance MR, Gaasterland T et al. Structural genomics: Beyond the Human Genome Project. Nature Genetics. 1999 Oct;23(2):151-157. https://doi.org/10.1038/13783
Burley, Stephen K. ; Almo, Steven C. ; Bonanno, Jeffrey B. ; Capel, Malcolm ; Chance, Mark R. ; Gaasterland, Terry ; Lin, Dawei ; Šali, Andrej ; Studier, F. William ; Swaminathan, Subramanyam. / Structural genomics : Beyond the Human Genome Project. In: Nature Genetics. 1999 ; Vol. 23, No. 2. pp. 151-157.
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