Stress and Resilience: Key Correlates of Mental Health and Substance Use in the Hispanic Community Health Study of Latino Youth

Krista M. Perreira, Ashley N. Marchante, Seth J. Schwartz, Carmen R. Isasi, Mercedes R. Carnethon, Heather L. Corliss, Robert C. Kaplan, Daniel A. Santisteban, Denise C. Vidot, Linda van Horn, Alan M. Delamater

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined associations of immigrant generation, acculturation, and sources of stress and resilience with four outcomes—depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, alcohol susceptibility, and smoking susceptibility. We used data from 1466 youth (ages 8–16) enrolled in the Hispanic Community Health Study of Latino Youth (SOL Youth), a probability sample of Hispanic/Latino youth living in Chicago (IL), Miami (FL), Bronx (NY), and San Diego (CA). We found no evidence of an immigrant paradox. Greater children’s acculturative stress was associated with depression/anxiety symptoms; greater parent’s acculturative stress was associated with smoking susceptibility. Family functioning and children’s ethnic identity were associated with fewer depression/anxiety symptoms and lower alcohol/smoking susceptibility. Although acculturation-related stressors increase youths’ risks for poor mental health and substance use, the development of positive ethnic identities and close, well-functioning family support systems can help protect Latino/Hispanic children from the negative behavioral and health-related consequences of stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 17 2018

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
Mental Health
Health
Acculturation
Anxiety
Smoking
Alcohols
Depression
Sampling Studies
Parents

Keywords

  • Depression/anxiety and smoking/alcohol
  • Immigrant paradox
  • Latino/Hispanic adolescent immigrant acculturation
  • Mental health and substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Stress and Resilience : Key Correlates of Mental Health and Substance Use in the Hispanic Community Health Study of Latino Youth. / Perreira, Krista M.; Marchante, Ashley N.; Schwartz, Seth J.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Corliss, Heather L.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Santisteban, Daniel A.; Vidot, Denise C.; van Horn, Linda; Delamater, Alan M.

In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 17.03.2018, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perreira, Krista M. ; Marchante, Ashley N. ; Schwartz, Seth J. ; Isasi, Carmen R. ; Carnethon, Mercedes R. ; Corliss, Heather L. ; Kaplan, Robert C. ; Santisteban, Daniel A. ; Vidot, Denise C. ; van Horn, Linda ; Delamater, Alan M. / Stress and Resilience : Key Correlates of Mental Health and Substance Use in the Hispanic Community Health Study of Latino Youth. In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. 2018 ; pp. 1-10.
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