South to North Migration Patterns of Tuberculosis Patients Diagnosed in the Mexican Border with Texas

Jennifer S. Curry, Bassent Abdelbary, Moncerrato García-Viveros, Juan Ignacio Garcia, Marcel Yotebieng, Adrian Rendon, Jordi B. Torrelles, Blanca I. Restrepo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Mexican state of Tamaulipas serves as a migration waypoint into the US. Here, we determined the contribution of immigrants to TB burden in Tamaulipas. TB surveillance data from Tamaulipas (2006–2013) was used to conduct a cross-sectional characterization of TB immigrants (born outside Tamaulipas) and identify their association with TB treatment outcomes. Immigrants comprised 30.8% of TB patients, with > 99% originating from internal Mexican migration. Most migration was from South to North, with cities adjacent to the US border as destinations. Immigrants had higher odds of risk factors for TB [older age (≥ 65 year old, OR 2.4, 95% CI 2.1, 2.8), low education (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2, 1.4), diabetes (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1, 1.4)], or abandoning treatment (adjusted OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.0, 1.5). There is a need to identify strategies to prevent TB more effectively in Tamaulipas, a Mexican migration waypoint.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Infectious diseases
  • Mexico-US border
  • Migration
  • Tuberculosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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