Sonic Hedgehog and BMP2 exert opposing actions on proliferation and differentiation of embryonic neural progenitor cells

Gaofa Zhu, Mark F. Mehler, Jie Zhao, Shau Yu Yung, John A. Kessler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) plays a critical role in brain development, its actions on neural progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation have not been clearly defined. Transcripts for the putative Shh-receptor genes patched (Ptc) and smoothened (Smo) are expressed by embryonic, postnatal, and adult progenitor cells, suggesting that Shh can act directly on these cells. The recombinant human amino-terminal fragment of Shh protein (Shh-N) alone did not support the survival of cultured progenitor cells, but treatment with Shh-N in the presence of bFGF increased progenitor cell proliferation. Furthermore, treatment of embryonic rat progenitor cells propagated either in primary culture or after mitogen expansion significantly increased the proportions of both β-tubulin- (neuronal marker) and O4- (oligodendroglial marker) immunoreactive cells and reduced the proportion of nestin- (uncommitted neural progenitor cell marker) immunoreactive cells. By contrast Shh-N had no effect on the elaboration of GFAP- (astroglial marker) immunoreactive cells. Cotreatment with Shh-N and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) inhibited the anti-proliferative, astroglial-inductive, and oligodendroglial-suppressive effects of BMP2. Our observations suggest that Shh-N selectively promotes the elaboration of both neuronal and oligodendroglial lineage species and inhibits the effects of BMP2 on progenitor cell proliferation and astroglial differentiation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)118-129
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopmental Biology
Volume215
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 1999

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Keywords

  • Bone morphogenetic protein
  • Neural lineage development
  • Patched
  • Proliferation
  • Smoothened
  • Sonic Hedgehog

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

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