Sociodemographic and condition-related characteristics associated with conduct problems in school-aged children with chronic health conditions

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Abstract

Objective: To examine whether sociodemographic and condition-related characteristics are associated with conduct problems in children with chronic health conditions. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Participants: Mothers of children 5 to 8 years old with diverse chronic health conditions who received care at 2 large urban medical centers. Measures: Mothers responded to a face- to-face structured interview that included the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory, the Psychiatric Symptom Index, and questions about sociodemographic and health condition-related characteristics. Results: Of the 356 children assessed, 138 (38.8%) had conduct problems as defined by criteria of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory. In logistic regression analyses, conduct problems were associated with younger child age, mother having a husband or partner unrelated to her child, poorer perceived prognosis, child having a learning disability, and maternal self-report of high emotional distress on the Psychiatric Symptom Index. Conduct problems were not related to child sex, maternal ethnicity or education, family receiving welfare, or a wide range of condition-related factors, including age at diagnosis, visibility to others, need to watch for sudden changes, presence of mobility or sensory-communication problems, using medication or equipment, annual hospitalizations, or physician visits. Conclusions: Conduct problems in children with chronic health conditions appear to be associated more closely with their sociodemographic and family characteristics than with condition-related risk factors. Additional research remains to be done on the ways that maternal adjustment, diagnosis-specific condition characteristics, and other risk factors influence children's behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)815-820
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume153
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1999

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Mothers
Health
Child Behavior
Equipment and Supplies
Psychiatry
Social Adjustment
Learning Disorders
Age Factors
Spouses
Self Report
Hospitalization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Communication
Regression Analysis
Interviews
Physicians
Education
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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title = "Sociodemographic and condition-related characteristics associated with conduct problems in school-aged children with chronic health conditions",
abstract = "Objective: To examine whether sociodemographic and condition-related characteristics are associated with conduct problems in children with chronic health conditions. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Participants: Mothers of children 5 to 8 years old with diverse chronic health conditions who received care at 2 large urban medical centers. Measures: Mothers responded to a face- to-face structured interview that included the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory, the Psychiatric Symptom Index, and questions about sociodemographic and health condition-related characteristics. Results: Of the 356 children assessed, 138 (38.8{\%}) had conduct problems as defined by criteria of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory. In logistic regression analyses, conduct problems were associated with younger child age, mother having a husband or partner unrelated to her child, poorer perceived prognosis, child having a learning disability, and maternal self-report of high emotional distress on the Psychiatric Symptom Index. Conduct problems were not related to child sex, maternal ethnicity or education, family receiving welfare, or a wide range of condition-related factors, including age at diagnosis, visibility to others, need to watch for sudden changes, presence of mobility or sensory-communication problems, using medication or equipment, annual hospitalizations, or physician visits. Conclusions: Conduct problems in children with chronic health conditions appear to be associated more closely with their sociodemographic and family characteristics than with condition-related risk factors. Additional research remains to be done on the ways that maternal adjustment, diagnosis-specific condition characteristics, and other risk factors influence children's behavior.",
author = "Silver, {Ellen J.} and Stein, {Ruth E. K.} and Bauman, {Laurie J.}",
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N2 - Objective: To examine whether sociodemographic and condition-related characteristics are associated with conduct problems in children with chronic health conditions. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Participants: Mothers of children 5 to 8 years old with diverse chronic health conditions who received care at 2 large urban medical centers. Measures: Mothers responded to a face- to-face structured interview that included the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory, the Psychiatric Symptom Index, and questions about sociodemographic and health condition-related characteristics. Results: Of the 356 children assessed, 138 (38.8%) had conduct problems as defined by criteria of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory. In logistic regression analyses, conduct problems were associated with younger child age, mother having a husband or partner unrelated to her child, poorer perceived prognosis, child having a learning disability, and maternal self-report of high emotional distress on the Psychiatric Symptom Index. Conduct problems were not related to child sex, maternal ethnicity or education, family receiving welfare, or a wide range of condition-related factors, including age at diagnosis, visibility to others, need to watch for sudden changes, presence of mobility or sensory-communication problems, using medication or equipment, annual hospitalizations, or physician visits. Conclusions: Conduct problems in children with chronic health conditions appear to be associated more closely with their sociodemographic and family characteristics than with condition-related risk factors. Additional research remains to be done on the ways that maternal adjustment, diagnosis-specific condition characteristics, and other risk factors influence children's behavior.

AB - Objective: To examine whether sociodemographic and condition-related characteristics are associated with conduct problems in children with chronic health conditions. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Participants: Mothers of children 5 to 8 years old with diverse chronic health conditions who received care at 2 large urban medical centers. Measures: Mothers responded to a face- to-face structured interview that included the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory, the Psychiatric Symptom Index, and questions about sociodemographic and health condition-related characteristics. Results: Of the 356 children assessed, 138 (38.8%) had conduct problems as defined by criteria of the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory. In logistic regression analyses, conduct problems were associated with younger child age, mother having a husband or partner unrelated to her child, poorer perceived prognosis, child having a learning disability, and maternal self-report of high emotional distress on the Psychiatric Symptom Index. Conduct problems were not related to child sex, maternal ethnicity or education, family receiving welfare, or a wide range of condition-related factors, including age at diagnosis, visibility to others, need to watch for sudden changes, presence of mobility or sensory-communication problems, using medication or equipment, annual hospitalizations, or physician visits. Conclusions: Conduct problems in children with chronic health conditions appear to be associated more closely with their sociodemographic and family characteristics than with condition-related risk factors. Additional research remains to be done on the ways that maternal adjustment, diagnosis-specific condition characteristics, and other risk factors influence children's behavior.

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