Sleep onset/maintenance difficulties and cognitive function in nondemented older adults

The role of cognitive reserve

Molly E. Zimmerman, Marcelo E. Bigal, Mindy Joy Katz, Adam M. Brickman, Richard B. Lipton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between cognitive function and sleep onset/maintenance difficulties (SO/MD) in nondemented older adults. We hypothesized that SO/MD negatively impacts cognition and that older adults with lower education would be especially vulnerable to its effects. The sample comprised 549 older adults from the Einstein Aging Study (EAS), a community-based cohort. Participants completed neuropsychological assessment and a sleep questionnaire. Univariate ANCOVAs were performed with cognitive performance as a dependent variable, SO/MD (present or absent) and education (lower: ≤12 years; higher: >12 years) as between-subjects factors, and age, ethnicity, gender, depression, and cardiovascular comorbidies as covariates. Participants were an average age of 79.7 ± 5.0 years (range = 71-97 years). Fifty-seven percent (n = 314) of the sample met criteria for SO/MD. Among participants with SO/MD, those with lower education performed more poorly on a test of category fluency than participants with higher education (means: 35.2 vs. 41.0; p <.001); among older adults without SO/MD, educational attainment had no measurable effect on cognition (SO/MD × education interaction (F(1,536) = 14.5; p =.00)). Consistent with the cognitive reserve hypothesis, older adults with lower education appear selectively vulnerable to the negative effects of sleep onset/maintenance difficulties on tests of verbal fluency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-470
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012

Fingerprint

Cognitive Reserve
sleep
Cognition
Sleep
Maintenance
Education
education
cognition
educational difficulties
Cognitive Function
Onset
Age Factors
ethnicity
Depression

Keywords

  • Cognitive Reserve
  • Depression
  • Education
  • Elderly
  • Neuropsychology
  • Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Sleep onset/maintenance difficulties and cognitive function in nondemented older adults : The role of cognitive reserve. / Zimmerman, Molly E.; Bigal, Marcelo E.; Katz, Mindy Joy; Brickman, Adam M.; Lipton, Richard B.

In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Vol. 18, No. 3, 05.2012, p. 461-470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b9927713c8d247d59b6ab4d56a68b884,
title = "Sleep onset/maintenance difficulties and cognitive function in nondemented older adults: The role of cognitive reserve",
abstract = "This study examined the relationship between cognitive function and sleep onset/maintenance difficulties (SO/MD) in nondemented older adults. We hypothesized that SO/MD negatively impacts cognition and that older adults with lower education would be especially vulnerable to its effects. The sample comprised 549 older adults from the Einstein Aging Study (EAS), a community-based cohort. Participants completed neuropsychological assessment and a sleep questionnaire. Univariate ANCOVAs were performed with cognitive performance as a dependent variable, SO/MD (present or absent) and education (lower: ≤12 years; higher: >12 years) as between-subjects factors, and age, ethnicity, gender, depression, and cardiovascular comorbidies as covariates. Participants were an average age of 79.7 ± 5.0 years (range = 71-97 years). Fifty-seven percent (n = 314) of the sample met criteria for SO/MD. Among participants with SO/MD, those with lower education performed more poorly on a test of category fluency than participants with higher education (means: 35.2 vs. 41.0; p <.001); among older adults without SO/MD, educational attainment had no measurable effect on cognition (SO/MD × education interaction (F(1,536) = 14.5; p =.00)). Consistent with the cognitive reserve hypothesis, older adults with lower education appear selectively vulnerable to the negative effects of sleep onset/maintenance difficulties on tests of verbal fluency.",
keywords = "Cognitive Reserve, Depression, Education, Elderly, Neuropsychology, Sleep",
author = "Zimmerman, {Molly E.} and Bigal, {Marcelo E.} and Katz, {Mindy Joy} and Brickman, {Adam M.} and Lipton, {Richard B.}",
year = "2012",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1017/S1355617711001901",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "461--470",
journal = "Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society",
issn = "1355-6177",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sleep onset/maintenance difficulties and cognitive function in nondemented older adults

T2 - The role of cognitive reserve

AU - Zimmerman, Molly E.

AU - Bigal, Marcelo E.

AU - Katz, Mindy Joy

AU - Brickman, Adam M.

AU - Lipton, Richard B.

PY - 2012/5

Y1 - 2012/5

N2 - This study examined the relationship between cognitive function and sleep onset/maintenance difficulties (SO/MD) in nondemented older adults. We hypothesized that SO/MD negatively impacts cognition and that older adults with lower education would be especially vulnerable to its effects. The sample comprised 549 older adults from the Einstein Aging Study (EAS), a community-based cohort. Participants completed neuropsychological assessment and a sleep questionnaire. Univariate ANCOVAs were performed with cognitive performance as a dependent variable, SO/MD (present or absent) and education (lower: ≤12 years; higher: >12 years) as between-subjects factors, and age, ethnicity, gender, depression, and cardiovascular comorbidies as covariates. Participants were an average age of 79.7 ± 5.0 years (range = 71-97 years). Fifty-seven percent (n = 314) of the sample met criteria for SO/MD. Among participants with SO/MD, those with lower education performed more poorly on a test of category fluency than participants with higher education (means: 35.2 vs. 41.0; p <.001); among older adults without SO/MD, educational attainment had no measurable effect on cognition (SO/MD × education interaction (F(1,536) = 14.5; p =.00)). Consistent with the cognitive reserve hypothesis, older adults with lower education appear selectively vulnerable to the negative effects of sleep onset/maintenance difficulties on tests of verbal fluency.

AB - This study examined the relationship between cognitive function and sleep onset/maintenance difficulties (SO/MD) in nondemented older adults. We hypothesized that SO/MD negatively impacts cognition and that older adults with lower education would be especially vulnerable to its effects. The sample comprised 549 older adults from the Einstein Aging Study (EAS), a community-based cohort. Participants completed neuropsychological assessment and a sleep questionnaire. Univariate ANCOVAs were performed with cognitive performance as a dependent variable, SO/MD (present or absent) and education (lower: ≤12 years; higher: >12 years) as between-subjects factors, and age, ethnicity, gender, depression, and cardiovascular comorbidies as covariates. Participants were an average age of 79.7 ± 5.0 years (range = 71-97 years). Fifty-seven percent (n = 314) of the sample met criteria for SO/MD. Among participants with SO/MD, those with lower education performed more poorly on a test of category fluency than participants with higher education (means: 35.2 vs. 41.0; p <.001); among older adults without SO/MD, educational attainment had no measurable effect on cognition (SO/MD × education interaction (F(1,536) = 14.5; p =.00)). Consistent with the cognitive reserve hypothesis, older adults with lower education appear selectively vulnerable to the negative effects of sleep onset/maintenance difficulties on tests of verbal fluency.

KW - Cognitive Reserve

KW - Depression

KW - Education

KW - Elderly

KW - Neuropsychology

KW - Sleep

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84861074514&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84861074514&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S1355617711001901

DO - 10.1017/S1355617711001901

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 461

EP - 470

JO - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society

JF - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society

SN - 1355-6177

IS - 3

ER -