Severe adverse life events and depressive symptoms among women with, or at risk for, HIV infection in four cities in the United States of America

Jan Moore, Paula Schuman, Ellie Schoenbaum, Bob Boland, Liza Solomon, Dawn Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

105 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine frequency and predictors of severe adverse life events and depressive symptoms among HIV-infected women and a comparison group of uninfected women. Design: Analysis of baseline data collected from HIV-infected and uninfected women in a prospective cohort study of HIV infection and women, the HIV Epidemiologic Research Study. Method: The sample of 871 HIV-infected and 439 demographically and behaviorally similar uninfected women were recruited from four metropolitan areas in the USA. Women provided interview information that included sociodemographic characteristics, sexual and drug-using behaviors, and social and psychological functioning. The outcome measures were number of severe adverse life events (e.g., insufficient money for necessities, physical attack or rape, death of a person close to them) and levels of depressive symptoms. Results: HIV-infected and uninfected women reported numerous adverse life events and high levels of depressive symptoms. The two groups, however, did not differ on either outcome measure. Low socio-economic status, injecting drug and crack cocaine use, and high risk sexual activity were related to reports of more adverse events and depressive symptoms for both groups. Conclusions: HIV-infected and uninfected women in socially and economically disadvantaged environments experience many adverse events and high levels of depressive symptoms. HIV infection, at least during the early phase, may be less important than socio-environmental factors in predicting negative psychosocial outcomes for women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2459-2468
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS
Volume13
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

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HIV Infections
Depression
HIV
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Crack Cocaine
Rape
Vulnerable Populations
Sexual Behavior
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Epidemiologic Studies
Cohort Studies
Economics
Prospective Studies
Interviews
Psychology
Research

Keywords

  • Depression
  • HIV
  • Life event

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Severe adverse life events and depressive symptoms among women with, or at risk for, HIV infection in four cities in the United States of America. / Moore, Jan; Schuman, Paula; Schoenbaum, Ellie; Boland, Bob; Solomon, Liza; Smith, Dawn.

In: AIDS, Vol. 13, No. 17, 1999, p. 2459-2468.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moore, Jan ; Schuman, Paula ; Schoenbaum, Ellie ; Boland, Bob ; Solomon, Liza ; Smith, Dawn. / Severe adverse life events and depressive symptoms among women with, or at risk for, HIV infection in four cities in the United States of America. In: AIDS. 1999 ; Vol. 13, No. 17. pp. 2459-2468.
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