Screening for Eating Disorders in Adolescents and Adults: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

Karina W. Davidson, Michael J. Barry, Carol M. Mangione, Michael Cabana, David Chelmow, Tumaini Rucker Coker, Esa M. Davis, Katrina E. Donahue, Carlos Roberto Jaén, Martha Kubik, Li Li, Gbenga Ogedegbe, Lori Pbert, John M. Ruiz, Michael Silverstein, James Stevermer, John B. Wong

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Importance: Eating disorders (eg, binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, and anorexia nervosa) are a group of psychiatric conditions defined as a disturbance in eating or eating-related behaviors that impair physical or psychosocial functioning. According to large US cohort studies, estimated lifetime prevalences for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder in adult women are 1.42%, 0.46%, and 1.25%, respectively, and are lower in adult men (anorexia nervosa, 0.12%; bulimia nervosa, 0.08%; binge eating disorder, 0.42%). Eating disorder prevalence ranges from 0.3% to 2.3% in adolescent females and 0.3% to 1.3% in adolescent males. Eating disorders are associated with short-term and long-term adverse health outcomes, including physical, psychological, and social problems. Objective: The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) commissioned a systematic review to evaluate the benefits and harms of screening for eating disorders in adolescents and adults with a normal or high body mass index. Evidence limited to populations who are underweight or have other physical signs or symptoms of eating disorders was not considered. The USPSTF has not previously made a recommendation on this topic. Population: Adolescents and adults (10 years or older) who have no signs or symptoms of eating disorders (eg, rapid weight loss, weight gain, or pronounced deviation from growth trajectory; pubertal delay; bradycardia; oligomenorrhea; and amenorrhea). Evidence Assessment: The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for eating disorders in adolescents and adults. The evidence is limited and the balance of benefits and harms cannot be determined. Recommendation: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for eating disorders in adolescents and adults. (I statement).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1061-1067
Number of pages7
JournalJAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume327
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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