Risk of colon cancer and coffee, tea, and sugar-sweetened soft drink intake: Pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies

Xuehong Zhang, Demetrius Albanes, W. Lawrence Beeson, Piet A. Van Den Brandt, Julie E. Buring, Andrew Flood, Jo L. Freudenheim, Edward L. Giovannucci, R. Alexandra Goldbohm, Karen Jaceldo-Siegl, Eric J. Jacobs, Vittorio Krogh, Susanna C. Larsson, James R. Marshall, Marjorie L. McCullough, Anthony B. Miller, Kim Robien, Thomas E. Rohan, Arthur Schatzkin, Sabina SieriDonna Spiegelman, Jarmo Virtamo, Alicja Wolk, Walter C. Willett, Shumin M. Zhang, Stephanie A. Smith-Warner

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Abstract

BackgroundThe relationships between coffee, tea, and sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drink consumption and colon cancer risk remain unresolved. MethodsWe investigated prospectively the association between coffee, tea, and sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drink consumption and colon cancer risk in a pooled analysis of primary data from 13 cohort studies. Among 731441 participants followed for up to 6-20 years, 5604 incident colon cancer case patients were identified. Study-specific relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled using a random-effects model. All statistical tests were two-sided. ResultsCompared with nonconsumers, the pooled multivariable relative risks were 1.07 (95% CI = 0.89 to 1.30, Ptrend =. 68) for coffee consumption greater than 1400 g/d (about six 8-oz cups) and 1.28 (95% CI = 1.02 to 1.61, Ptrend =. 01) for tea consumption greater than 900 g/d (about four 8-oz cups). For sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drink consumption, the pooled multivariable relative risk comparing consumption greater than 550 g/d (about 18 oz) to nonconsumers was 0.94 (95% CI = 0.66 to 1.32, Ptrend =. 91). No statistically significant between-studies heterogeneity was observed for the highest category of each beverage consumed (P >. 20). The observed associations did not differ by sex, smoking status, alcohol consumption, body mass index, physical activity, or tumor site (P >. 05). ConclusionsDrinking coffee or sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drinks was not associated with colon cancer risk. However, a modest positive association with higher tea consumption is possible and requires further study. The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)771-783
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume102
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Zhang, X., Albanes, D., Beeson, W. L., Van Den Brandt, P. A., Buring, J. E., Flood, A., Freudenheim, J. L., Giovannucci, E. L., Goldbohm, R. A., Jaceldo-Siegl, K., Jacobs, E. J., Krogh, V., Larsson, S. C., Marshall, J. R., McCullough, M. L., Miller, A. B., Robien, K., Rohan, T. E., Schatzkin, A., ... Smith-Warner, S. A. (2010). Risk of colon cancer and coffee, tea, and sugar-sweetened soft drink intake: Pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 102(11), 771-783. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djq107