Respiratory symptoms were associated with lower spirometry results during the first examination of WTC responders

Iris Udasin, Clyde B. Schechter, Laura Crowley, Anays Sotolongo, Michael Gochfeld, Benjamin Luft, Jacqueline Moline, Denise Harrison, Paul Enright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Determine if World Trade Center (WTC) disaster responders had lower lung function and higher bronchodilator responsiveness than those with respiratory symptoms and conditions. Methods: We evaluated cardinal respiratory symptoms (dyspnea, wheezing, dry cough, productive cough) and determined the difference in FEV 1, FVC, and bronchodilator responsiveness. Results: All respiratory symptoms were associated with a lower FEV 1 and FVC, and a larger bronchodilator response. Responders reporting chronic productive cough, starting during WTC work and persisting, had a mean FEV 1 109 mL lower than those without chronic persistent cough; their odds of having abnormally low FEV 1 was 1.40 times higher; and they were 1.65 times as likely to demonstrate bronchodilator responsiveness. Conclusions:: Responders reporting chronic persistent cough, wheezing or dyspnea at first medical examination were more likely to have lower lung function and bronchodilator responsiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-54
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

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Bronchodilator Agents
Spirometry
Cough
Respiratory Sounds
Dyspnea
Lung
Disasters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Respiratory symptoms were associated with lower spirometry results during the first examination of WTC responders. / Udasin, Iris; Schechter, Clyde B.; Crowley, Laura; Sotolongo, Anays; Gochfeld, Michael; Luft, Benjamin; Moline, Jacqueline; Harrison, Denise; Enright, Paul.

In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 53, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 49-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Udasin, Iris ; Schechter, Clyde B. ; Crowley, Laura ; Sotolongo, Anays ; Gochfeld, Michael ; Luft, Benjamin ; Moline, Jacqueline ; Harrison, Denise ; Enright, Paul. / Respiratory symptoms were associated with lower spirometry results during the first examination of WTC responders. In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 53, No. 1. pp. 49-54.
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