Respiratory Medications in Infants <29 Weeks during the First Year Postdischarge: The Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes Program (PROP) Consortium

PROP Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine patterns of respiratory medications used in neonatal intensive care unit graduates. Study design: The Prematurity Respiratory Outcomes Program enrolled 835 babies <29 weeks of gestation in the first week. Of 751 survivors, 738 (98%) completed at least 1, and 85% completed all 4, postdischarge medication usage in-person/telephone parental questionnaires requested at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of corrected age. Respiratory drug usage over the first year of life after in neonatal intensive care unit discharge was analyzed. Results: During any given quarter, 66%-75% of the babies received no respiratory medication and 45% of the infants received no respiratory drug over the first year. The most common postdischarge medication was the inhaled bronchodilator albuterol; its use increased significantly from 13% to 31%. Diuretic usage decreased significantly from 11% to 2% over the first year. Systemic steroids (prednisone, most commonly) were used in approximately 5% of subjects in any one quarter. Inhaled steroids significantly increased over the first year from 9% to 14% at 12 months. Drug exposure changed significantly based on gestational age with 72% of babies born at 23-24 weeks receiving at least 1 respiratory medication but only 40% of babies born at 28 weeks. Overall, at some time in the first year, 55% of infants received at least 1 drug including an inhaled bronchodilator (45%), an inhaled steroid (22%), a systemic steroid (15%), or diuretic (12%). Conclusion: Many babies born at <29 weeks have no respiratory medication exposure postdischarge during the first year of life. Inhaled medications, including bronchodilators and steroids, increase over the first year.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)148-155.e3
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume208
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Fingerprint

Steroids
Bronchodilator Agents
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Diuretics
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Albuterol
Prednisone
Telephone
Gestational Age
Survivors
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • bronchopulmonary dysplasia
  • drug
  • prematurity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Respiratory Medications in Infants <29 Weeks during the First Year Postdischarge : The Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes Program (PROP) Consortium. / PROP Investigators.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 208, 01.05.2019, p. 148-155.e3.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f91ed3133ba34e99bdaaebb2813aa0cf,
title = "Respiratory Medications in Infants <29 Weeks during the First Year Postdischarge: The Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes Program (PROP) Consortium",
abstract = "Objective: To determine patterns of respiratory medications used in neonatal intensive care unit graduates. Study design: The Prematurity Respiratory Outcomes Program enrolled 835 babies <29 weeks of gestation in the first week. Of 751 survivors, 738 (98{\%}) completed at least 1, and 85{\%} completed all 4, postdischarge medication usage in-person/telephone parental questionnaires requested at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of corrected age. Respiratory drug usage over the first year of life after in neonatal intensive care unit discharge was analyzed. Results: During any given quarter, 66{\%}-75{\%} of the babies received no respiratory medication and 45{\%} of the infants received no respiratory drug over the first year. The most common postdischarge medication was the inhaled bronchodilator albuterol; its use increased significantly from 13{\%} to 31{\%}. Diuretic usage decreased significantly from 11{\%} to 2{\%} over the first year. Systemic steroids (prednisone, most commonly) were used in approximately 5{\%} of subjects in any one quarter. Inhaled steroids significantly increased over the first year from 9{\%} to 14{\%} at 12 months. Drug exposure changed significantly based on gestational age with 72{\%} of babies born at 23-24 weeks receiving at least 1 respiratory medication but only 40{\%} of babies born at 28 weeks. Overall, at some time in the first year, 55{\%} of infants received at least 1 drug including an inhaled bronchodilator (45{\%}), an inhaled steroid (22{\%}), a systemic steroid (15{\%}), or diuretic (12{\%}). Conclusion: Many babies born at <29 weeks have no respiratory medication exposure postdischarge during the first year of life. Inhaled medications, including bronchodilators and steroids, increase over the first year.",
keywords = "bronchopulmonary dysplasia, drug, prematurity",
author = "{PROP Investigators} and Ryan, {Rita M.} and Keller, {Roberta L.} and Poindexter, {Brenda B.} and D'Angio, {Carl T.} and Shaw, {Pamela A.} and Bellamy, {Scarlett L.} and Moore, {Paul E.} and Christopher McPherson and Greenberg, {James M.} and Barbara Alexander and Tari Gratton and Cathy Grigsby and Beth Koch and Kelly Thornton and Pamela Bates and Claudia Cleveland and Julie Hoffmann and Laura Linneman and Jayne Sicard-Su and Gina Simpson and Asselin, {Jeanette M.} and Samantha Balan and Katrina Burson and Cheryl Chapin and Erna Josiah-Davis and Carmen Garcia and Hart Horneman and Rick Hinojosa and Christopher Johnson and Susan Kelley and Knowles, {Karin L.} and Lillie, {M. Layne} and Karen Martin and Sarah Martin and Julie Arldt-McAlister and McDavid, {Georgia E.} and Lori Pacello and Shawna Rodgers and Sperry, {Daniel K.} and Beller, {Amy B.} and Hunt, {Mark O’} and Rogers, {Theresa J.} and Settles, {Odessa L.} and Steven Steele and Sharon Wadley and Shannon Castiglione and Aimee Horan and Deanna Maffet and Jane O'Donnell and Aschner, {Judy L.}",
year = "2019",
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pages = "148--155.e3",
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T1 - Respiratory Medications in Infants <29 Weeks during the First Year Postdischarge

T2 - The Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes Program (PROP) Consortium

AU - PROP Investigators

AU - Ryan, Rita M.

AU - Keller, Roberta L.

AU - Poindexter, Brenda B.

AU - D'Angio, Carl T.

AU - Shaw, Pamela A.

AU - Bellamy, Scarlett L.

AU - Moore, Paul E.

AU - McPherson, Christopher

AU - Greenberg, James M.

AU - Alexander, Barbara

AU - Gratton, Tari

AU - Grigsby, Cathy

AU - Koch, Beth

AU - Thornton, Kelly

AU - Bates, Pamela

AU - Cleveland, Claudia

AU - Hoffmann, Julie

AU - Linneman, Laura

AU - Sicard-Su, Jayne

AU - Simpson, Gina

AU - Asselin, Jeanette M.

AU - Balan, Samantha

AU - Burson, Katrina

AU - Chapin, Cheryl

AU - Josiah-Davis, Erna

AU - Garcia, Carmen

AU - Horneman, Hart

AU - Hinojosa, Rick

AU - Johnson, Christopher

AU - Kelley, Susan

AU - Knowles, Karin L.

AU - Lillie, M. Layne

AU - Martin, Karen

AU - Martin, Sarah

AU - Arldt-McAlister, Julie

AU - McDavid, Georgia E.

AU - Pacello, Lori

AU - Rodgers, Shawna

AU - Sperry, Daniel K.

AU - Beller, Amy B.

AU - Hunt, Mark O’

AU - Rogers, Theresa J.

AU - Settles, Odessa L.

AU - Steele, Steven

AU - Wadley, Sharon

AU - Castiglione, Shannon

AU - Horan, Aimee

AU - Maffet, Deanna

AU - O'Donnell, Jane

AU - Aschner, Judy L.

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Objective: To determine patterns of respiratory medications used in neonatal intensive care unit graduates. Study design: The Prematurity Respiratory Outcomes Program enrolled 835 babies <29 weeks of gestation in the first week. Of 751 survivors, 738 (98%) completed at least 1, and 85% completed all 4, postdischarge medication usage in-person/telephone parental questionnaires requested at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of corrected age. Respiratory drug usage over the first year of life after in neonatal intensive care unit discharge was analyzed. Results: During any given quarter, 66%-75% of the babies received no respiratory medication and 45% of the infants received no respiratory drug over the first year. The most common postdischarge medication was the inhaled bronchodilator albuterol; its use increased significantly from 13% to 31%. Diuretic usage decreased significantly from 11% to 2% over the first year. Systemic steroids (prednisone, most commonly) were used in approximately 5% of subjects in any one quarter. Inhaled steroids significantly increased over the first year from 9% to 14% at 12 months. Drug exposure changed significantly based on gestational age with 72% of babies born at 23-24 weeks receiving at least 1 respiratory medication but only 40% of babies born at 28 weeks. Overall, at some time in the first year, 55% of infants received at least 1 drug including an inhaled bronchodilator (45%), an inhaled steroid (22%), a systemic steroid (15%), or diuretic (12%). Conclusion: Many babies born at <29 weeks have no respiratory medication exposure postdischarge during the first year of life. Inhaled medications, including bronchodilators and steroids, increase over the first year.

AB - Objective: To determine patterns of respiratory medications used in neonatal intensive care unit graduates. Study design: The Prematurity Respiratory Outcomes Program enrolled 835 babies <29 weeks of gestation in the first week. Of 751 survivors, 738 (98%) completed at least 1, and 85% completed all 4, postdischarge medication usage in-person/telephone parental questionnaires requested at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of corrected age. Respiratory drug usage over the first year of life after in neonatal intensive care unit discharge was analyzed. Results: During any given quarter, 66%-75% of the babies received no respiratory medication and 45% of the infants received no respiratory drug over the first year. The most common postdischarge medication was the inhaled bronchodilator albuterol; its use increased significantly from 13% to 31%. Diuretic usage decreased significantly from 11% to 2% over the first year. Systemic steroids (prednisone, most commonly) were used in approximately 5% of subjects in any one quarter. Inhaled steroids significantly increased over the first year from 9% to 14% at 12 months. Drug exposure changed significantly based on gestational age with 72% of babies born at 23-24 weeks receiving at least 1 respiratory medication but only 40% of babies born at 28 weeks. Overall, at some time in the first year, 55% of infants received at least 1 drug including an inhaled bronchodilator (45%), an inhaled steroid (22%), a systemic steroid (15%), or diuretic (12%). Conclusion: Many babies born at <29 weeks have no respiratory medication exposure postdischarge during the first year of life. Inhaled medications, including bronchodilators and steroids, increase over the first year.

KW - bronchopulmonary dysplasia

KW - drug

KW - prematurity

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U2 - 10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.12.009

DO - 10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.12.009

M3 - Article

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VL - 208

SP - 148-155.e3

JO - Journal of Pediatrics

JF - Journal of Pediatrics

SN - 0022-3476

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