Regulation of hepatocyte engraftment and proliferation after cytotoxic drug-induced perturbation of the rat liver

Kyung Sik Kim, Brigid Joseph, Mari Inada, Sanjeev Gupta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Perturbations in specific liver cell compartments benefit transplanted cell engraftment and/or proliferation. We analyzed whether cytotoxic drugs interfering with the integrity of genomic DNA or cell division could be useful for liver cell transplantation. Methods. We used dipeptidyl peptidase IV deficient (DPPIV-) rats as recipients of syngeneic F344 rat hepatocytes. Rats were pretreated with doxorubicin, irinotecan, or vincristine prior to cell transplantation and synergistic liver perturbations were induced by drug administration followed by partial hepatectomy or carbon tetrachloride treatments. Transplanted cells were identified by DPPIV histochemistry and cell engraftment and proliferation were analyzed morphometrically. Perturbations in endothelial, Kupffer cell, and hepatocyte compartments were analyzed by electron microscopy, carbon incorporation, and blood tests, respectively. Results. Cell engraftment was improved in rats treated with doxorubicin but not with irinotecan or vincristine. Doxorubicin disrupted endothelial cells for up to seven days without causing Kupffer cell or hepatocellular toxicity. Neither doxorubicin nor vincristine induced liver repopulation in animals up to three months, including after partial hepatectomy or carbon tetrachloride-induced additional liver injury. Conclusions. Doxorubicin-induced hepatic endothelial damage enhanced cell engraftment, which should be useful in cell therapy strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)653-659
Number of pages7
JournalTransplantation
Volume80
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2005

Fingerprint

irinotecan
Doxorubicin
Hepatocytes
Vincristine
Liver
Kupffer Cells
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Carbon Tetrachloride
Cell Transplantation
Hepatectomy
Endothelial Cells
Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4
Inbred F344 Rats
Hematologic Tests
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Cell Division
Liver Transplantation
Electron Microscopy
Carbon
Cell Proliferation

Keywords

  • Chemotherapeutic drugs
  • Hepatocyte
  • Liver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation
  • Immunology

Cite this

Regulation of hepatocyte engraftment and proliferation after cytotoxic drug-induced perturbation of the rat liver. / Kim, Kyung Sik; Joseph, Brigid; Inada, Mari; Gupta, Sanjeev.

In: Transplantation, Vol. 80, No. 5, 15.09.2005, p. 653-659.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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