Recalled early life adversity and pain: the role of mood, sleep, optimism, and control

Ambika Mathur, Jennifer E. Graham-Engeland, Danica C. Slavish, Joshua M. Smyth, Richard B. Lipton, Mindy Joy Katz, Martin J. Sliwinski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Early life adversity (ELA) has been associated with pain symptomatology in adulthood, but mechanisms and moderators of these associations are unclear. Using recall based and concurrently assessed self-report data, we examined associations between ELA, mood, sleep, and recent pain intensity and interference, and whether optimism and perceived control weakened these associations in a midlife community sample of diverse adults reporting some ELA. Controlling for demographic variables and BMI, higher levels of ELA were associated with more pain intensity and interference; greater sleep disturbance and negative mood accounted for these associations. When moderation was examined, only the path from sleep disturbance to pain interference was significantly attenuated for those with higher optimism and higher perceived control. These findings suggest that higher levels of ELA may link with pain in adulthood through poorer mood and sleep, and that resilience resources such as optimism and control may buffer some of these pathways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 21 2018

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Sleep
Pain
Self Report
Buffers
Demography
Optimism

Keywords

  • Early life adversity
  • Mood disturbance
  • Optimism
  • Pain
  • Perceived control and mastery
  • Sleep disturbance
  • Structural equation modeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Recalled early life adversity and pain : the role of mood, sleep, optimism, and control. / Mathur, Ambika; Graham-Engeland, Jennifer E.; Slavish, Danica C.; Smyth, Joshua M.; Lipton, Richard B.; Katz, Mindy Joy; Sliwinski, Martin J.

In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 21.02.2018, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mathur, Ambika ; Graham-Engeland, Jennifer E. ; Slavish, Danica C. ; Smyth, Joshua M. ; Lipton, Richard B. ; Katz, Mindy Joy ; Sliwinski, Martin J. / Recalled early life adversity and pain : the role of mood, sleep, optimism, and control. In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine. 2018 ; pp. 1-12.
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