Reasons hospitals give for not offering hepatitis B vaccine to low-risk newborns

Kimberly D. Aiken, Sarah J. Clark, Michael D. Cabana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

After a temporary suspension of hepatitis B vaccination (HBV) for low-risk newborns in July 1999, some hospitals still do not offer HBV to these infants. A semi-structured telephone survey of medical directors from a national random sample of 296 hospital nurseries was completed from August 2000 to April 2001 and analyzed using qualitative techniques. Directors of 201 of 290 eligible nurseries (71%) participated. Twenty-eight nurseries have never offered HBV to low-risk newborns ("Never Offered HBV") and 37 nurseries had offered HBV to low-risk newborns before July 1999, but discontinued this practice after the temporary suspension ("Discontinued HBV"). Common reasons for not offering HBV to low-risk newborns were difficulty with reimbursement and convenience of outpatient administration. In addition, directors of "Never Offered HBV" nurseries cited low disease incidence in their patient population, whereas directors of "Discontinued HBV" cited preference for the combination hepatitis B-Haemophilus influenza type b vaccine as important factors. Multi-faceted interventions may be necessary to increase HBV use in the nursery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)681-686
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume41
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Hepatitis B Vaccines
Hepatitis B
Vaccination
Newborn Infant
Nurseries
Hospital Nurseries
Suspensions
Haemophilus Vaccines
Physician Executives
Haemophilus influenzae type b
Telephone
Outpatients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Reasons hospitals give for not offering hepatitis B vaccine to low-risk newborns. / Aiken, Kimberly D.; Clark, Sarah J.; Cabana, Michael D.

In: Clinical Pediatrics, Vol. 41, No. 9, 01.01.2002, p. 681-686.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aiken, Kimberly D. ; Clark, Sarah J. ; Cabana, Michael D. / Reasons hospitals give for not offering hepatitis B vaccine to low-risk newborns. In: Clinical Pediatrics. 2002 ; Vol. 41, No. 9. pp. 681-686.
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