Rating of medication influences (ROMI) scale in schizophrenia

Peter Weiden, Bruce D. Rapkin, Tasha Mott, Annette Zygmunt, Dodi Goldman, Marcela Horvitz-lennon, Allen Frances

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

257 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Noncompliance with neuroleptic treatment is a major barrier to delivery of effective treatment for schizophrenia outpatients. This article describes the development of a standardized measure for the assessment of attitudinal and behavioral factors influencing patient compliance with neuroleptic treatment. The Rating of Medication Influences (ROMI) scale was developed as part of a longitudinal study of neuroleptic noncompliance in schizophrenia and administered to 115 discharged schizophrenia outpatients. Analyses of the following were conducted to assess the scale's psychometric properties: (1) interrater reliability, (2) internal consistency, (3) principal components, (4) correlation with other subjective measures, and (5) correlation with independent family reports. Most (95%) of the ROMI patient-report items were reliable, whereas rater-judgment items were not reliable. The rater section was dropped. A principal components analysis of the reliable patient-report items yielded three subscales related to compliance (Prevention, Influence of Others, and Medication Affinity) and five subscales related to noncompliance (Denial/Dysphoria, Logistical Problems, Rejection of Label, Family Influence, and Negative Therapeutic Alliance). There were significant correlations between these subscales, and independently obtained family-report ROMI items were significant. The Denial/Dysphoria subscale correlated strongly with two other published measures of dysphoric response to neuroleptics, whereas the other noncompliance sub-scales did not. The ROMI is a reliable and valid instrument that can be used to assess the patient's subjective reasons for medication compliance and noncompliance. The subscale findings suggest that the ROMI provides a more comprehensive data base for patient-reported compliance attitudes than the other available subjective measures. Indications for use of the ROMI and other subjective measures of neuroleptic response are reviewed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-310
Number of pages14
JournalSchizophrenia Bulletin
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

schizophrenia
ratings
Antipsychotic Agents
Schizophrenia
Noncompliance
Compliance
Medication Adherence
Patient Compliance
Outpatients
psychometrics
Principal component analysis
Labels
Therapeutics
Principal Component Analysis
Psychometrics
data bases
Longitudinal Studies
principal components analysis
Internal Consistency
rejection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Radiation
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Weiden, P., Rapkin, B. D., Mott, T., Zygmunt, A., Goldman, D., Horvitz-lennon, M., & Frances, A. (1994). Rating of medication influences (ROMI) scale in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 20(2), 297-310. https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/20.2.297

Rating of medication influences (ROMI) scale in schizophrenia. / Weiden, Peter; Rapkin, Bruce D.; Mott, Tasha; Zygmunt, Annette; Goldman, Dodi; Horvitz-lennon, Marcela; Frances, Allen.

In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, Vol. 20, No. 2, 1994, p. 297-310.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weiden, P, Rapkin, BD, Mott, T, Zygmunt, A, Goldman, D, Horvitz-lennon, M & Frances, A 1994, 'Rating of medication influences (ROMI) scale in schizophrenia', Schizophrenia Bulletin, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 297-310. https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/20.2.297
Weiden, Peter ; Rapkin, Bruce D. ; Mott, Tasha ; Zygmunt, Annette ; Goldman, Dodi ; Horvitz-lennon, Marcela ; Frances, Allen. / Rating of medication influences (ROMI) scale in schizophrenia. In: Schizophrenia Bulletin. 1994 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 297-310.
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