Radiotherapy dosing for locally advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma: "MTD" or "ALARA"?

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) is typically treated with thoracic radiotherapy, often in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. Despite tremendous advances in the evaluation, treatment techniques, and supportive care measures provided to LA-NSCLC patients, local disease progression and distant metastases frequently develop following definitive therapy. A recent landmark randomized trial demonstrated that radiotherapy dose escalation may reduce survival rates, highlighting our poor understanding of the effects of thoracic radiotherapy for LA-NSCLC. Here, we present rationale for further studies of radiotherapy dose escalation as well as arguments for exploring relatively low radiotherapy doses for LA-NSCLC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number205
JournalFrontiers in Oncology
Volume7
Issue numberSEP
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 21 2017

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Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Radiotherapy
Thorax
Disease Progression
Survival Rate
Neoplasm Metastasis
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Chemoradiotherapy
  • Dose-response relationship
  • Locally advanced NSCLC
  • Lung cancer
  • Radiation
  • Radiotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Radiotherapy dosing for locally advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma : "MTD" or "ALARA"? / Ohri, Nitin.

In: Frontiers in Oncology, Vol. 7, No. SEP, 205, 21.09.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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