Racial and Ethnic Differences in Urodynamic Parameters in Women with Overactive Bladder Symptoms

Stephanie W. Zuo, Keara English, Ilir Agalliu, Ava Leegant, Nitya Abraham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives This study aimed to identify differences in severity of overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms in women of different races and ethnicities using urodynamic study (UDS) parameters. Methods We performed a 5-year retrospective chart review from January 2014 to January 2019 of women 18 years and older who endorsed OAB symptoms and underwent UDS at a racially and ethnically diverse academic urban medical center. Logistic and linear regressions were used to examine the associations of various UDS parameters between racial/ethnic groups, after adjusting for age, diabetes, and parity. Results A total of 161 women with an average age of 59 years were included in the study. The racial/ethnic composition of the group was Hispanic (62%), black (24%), and white (11%). Symptoms on presentation included urgency and/or frequency (11.8%), urge incontinence (23.0%), or mixed urinary symptoms (65.2%). Black and Hispanic women presented with differing symptoms (urgency/frequency vs mixed urinary symptoms). Half of the patients (n = 82) had detrusor overactivity. Compared with whites, blacks were 3.4-fold more likely to have detrusor overactivity (95% confidence interval, 0.99-11.40) and had lower volumes at time of "strong desire" (-102.6 mL, P = 0.003). Hispanics had on average 75.88 mL less volume at sensation of "strong desire" (P = 0.016) than did whites. Conclusions Our study suggests that minority race and ethnicity may be associated with worse performance on certain UDS parameters. Future studies should aim to understand if these differences are due to genetic, disease-related, behavioral, and/or socioeconomic factors and whether these differences are associated with worse subjective OAB.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-145
Number of pages5
JournalFemale Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2020

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • overactive bladder
  • race and ethnicity
  • urodynamic study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Urology

Cite this