Rab3A is essential for mossy fibre long-term potentiation in the hippocampus

Pablo E. Castillo, Roger Janz, Thomas C. Südhof, Thanos Tzounopoulos, Robert C. Malenka, Roger A. Nicoll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

270 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Repetitive activation of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system results in a long-lasting increase in synaptic transmission called long-term potentiation (LTP). It is generally believed that this synaptic plasticity may underlie certain forms of learning and memory. LTP at most synapses involves the activation of the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) subtype of glutamate receptor, but LTP at hippocampal mossy fibre synapses is independent of NMDA receptors and has a component that is induced and expressed presynaptically. It appears to be triggered by a rise in presynaptic Ca2+ (refs 2, 3), and requires the activation of protein kinase A, which leads to an increased release of glutamate. A great deal is known about the biochemical steps involved in the vesicular release of transmitter, but none of these steps has been directly implicated in long-term synaptic plasticity. Here we show that, although a variety of short-term plasticities are normal, LTP at mossy fibre synapses is abolished in mice lacking the synaptic vesicle protein Rab3A.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)590-593
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume388
Issue number6642
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Long-Term Potentiation
Synapses
Hippocampus
Neuronal Plasticity
rab3A GTP-Binding Protein
Hippocampal Mossy Fibers
Synaptic Vesicles
Glutamate Receptors
N-Methylaspartate
Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Synaptic Transmission
Glutamic Acid
Central Nervous System
Learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Castillo, P. E., Janz, R., Südhof, T. C., Tzounopoulos, T., Malenka, R. C., & Nicoll, R. A. (1997). Rab3A is essential for mossy fibre long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. Nature, 388(6642), 590-593. https://doi.org/10.1038/41574

Rab3A is essential for mossy fibre long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. / Castillo, Pablo E.; Janz, Roger; Südhof, Thomas C.; Tzounopoulos, Thanos; Malenka, Robert C.; Nicoll, Roger A.

In: Nature, Vol. 388, No. 6642, 1997, p. 590-593.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Castillo, PE, Janz, R, Südhof, TC, Tzounopoulos, T, Malenka, RC & Nicoll, RA 1997, 'Rab3A is essential for mossy fibre long-term potentiation in the hippocampus', Nature, vol. 388, no. 6642, pp. 590-593. https://doi.org/10.1038/41574
Castillo PE, Janz R, Südhof TC, Tzounopoulos T, Malenka RC, Nicoll RA. Rab3A is essential for mossy fibre long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. Nature. 1997;388(6642):590-593. https://doi.org/10.1038/41574
Castillo, Pablo E. ; Janz, Roger ; Südhof, Thomas C. ; Tzounopoulos, Thanos ; Malenka, Robert C. ; Nicoll, Roger A. / Rab3A is essential for mossy fibre long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. In: Nature. 1997 ; Vol. 388, No. 6642. pp. 590-593.
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