Quantitative precision of optical frequency domain imaging: direct comparison with frequency domain optical coherence tomography and intravascular ultrasound

Yuhei Kobayashi, Hideki Kitahara, Shigemitsu Tanaka, Kozo Okada, Takumi Kimura, Fumiaki Ikeno, Paul G. Yock, Peter J. Fitzgerald, Yasuhiro Honda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

No systematic validation study is available with optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI), directly compared with frequency domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Controversy also remains about the impact of different stent contour tracing methods by OFDI/FD-OCT. In vitro: coronary phantom models (1.51–5.04 mm) were imaged with OFDI, FD-OCT, and IVUS, demonstrating excellent quantitative precision with a slight overestimation of mean lumen diameter (difference 0.01–0.02 mm). In vivo: corresponding 64 OFDI/IVUS images of stented coronary segments from 20 swines were analyzed. Minimum lumen area by OFDI was larger than IVUS at baseline (P < 0.001), whereas it was smaller than IVUS at follow-up. When stent was traced at leading edges of struts by OFDI, minimum stent area was similar between OFDI and IVUS (P = 0.60). When traced at the highest intensity points of struts by OFDI, it was significantly larger in OFDI than in IVUS (P < 0.001). Three modalities have clinically acceptable precision across the wide range of lumen diameters. In vivo measurements by OFDI and IVUS could slightly be discrepant depending on the parameters and time points. In stent assessment by OFDI, the 2 methods led to a small but systematic difference; therefore, consistency in methodology is advised for comparative studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-88
Number of pages10
JournalCardiovascular Intervention and Therapeutics
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Imaging
  • Intravascular ultrasound
  • Optical frequency domain imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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