Qualitative Assessment of Academic Radiation Oncology Department Chairs' Insights on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Progress, Challenges, and Future Aspirations

Rochelle D. Jones, Christina H. Chapman, Emma B. Holliday, Nafisha Lalani, Emily Wilson, James A. Bonner, Benjamin Movsas, Shalom Kalnicki, Silvia C. Formenti, Charles R. Thomas, Stephen M. Hahn, Fei Fei Liu, Reshma Jagsi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: A lack of diversity has been observed in radiation oncology (RO), with women and certain racial/ethnic groups underrepresented as trainees, faculty, and practicing physicians. We sought to gain a nuanced understanding of how to best promote diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) based on the insights of RO department chairs, with particular attention given to the experiences of the few women and underrepresented minorities (URMs) in these influential positions. Methods and Materials: From March to June 2016, we conducted telephone interviews with 24 RO department chairs (of 27 invited). Purposive sampling was used to invite all chairs who were women (n = 13) or URMs (n = 3) and 11 male chairs who were not URMs. Multiple analysts coded the verbatim transcripts. Results: Five themes were identified: (1) commitment to DEI promotes quality health care and innovation; (2) gaps remain despite some progress with promoting diversity in RO; (3) women and URM faculty continue to experience challenges in various career domains; (4) solutions to DEI issues would be facilitated by acknowledging realities of gender and race; and (5) expansion of the career pipeline is needed. Conclusions: The chairs' insights had policy-relevant implications. Bias training should broach tokenism, blindness, and intersectionality. Efforts to recruit and support diverse talent should be deliberate and proactive. Bridge programs could engage students before their application to medical school.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Radiation Oncology
seats
minorities
inclusions
vacuum
radiation
students
Aptitude
Quality of Health Care
blindness
Blindness
Medical Schools
Ethnic Groups
physicians
telephones
health
Interviews
Students
Physicians
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiation
  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Qualitative Assessment of Academic Radiation Oncology Department Chairs' Insights on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion : Progress, Challenges, and Future Aspirations. / Jones, Rochelle D.; Chapman, Christina H.; Holliday, Emma B.; Lalani, Nafisha; Wilson, Emily; Bonner, James A.; Movsas, Benjamin; Kalnicki, Shalom; Formenti, Silvia C.; Thomas, Charles R.; Hahn, Stephen M.; Liu, Fei Fei; Jagsi, Reshma.

In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jones, Rochelle D. ; Chapman, Christina H. ; Holliday, Emma B. ; Lalani, Nafisha ; Wilson, Emily ; Bonner, James A. ; Movsas, Benjamin ; Kalnicki, Shalom ; Formenti, Silvia C. ; Thomas, Charles R. ; Hahn, Stephen M. ; Liu, Fei Fei ; Jagsi, Reshma. / Qualitative Assessment of Academic Radiation Oncology Department Chairs' Insights on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion : Progress, Challenges, and Future Aspirations. In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics. 2018.
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