Project HEAL: Peer education leads to weight loss in harlem

Judith Z. Goldfinger, Guedy Arniella, Judith Wylie-Rosett, Carol R. Horowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Obesity and diabetes are epidemic in the predominantly minority Harlem community. To address them, a coalition of community and academic leaders tested the effectiveness of a peer-led weight loss course. Methods. The coalition developed Project HEAL: Healthy Eating, Active Lifestyles through extensive collaboration with community members and experts in nutrition, exercise, and peer education. We piloted the course in a local church and assessed its impact through pre and post course weights, self-reported behaviors and quality of life. Results. Twenty-six overweight and obese African American adults lost a mean of 4.4 pounds at 10 weeks, 8.4 pounds at 22 weeks, and 9.8 pounds at 1 year. Participants reported decreased fat consumption and sedentary hours, and improved health related quality of life. Conclusions. A peer-led, community-based course can lead to weight loss and behavior change. The minority communities most affected by obesity and diabetes may benefit from this low-cost, culturally appropriate intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-192
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

Fingerprint

Weight Loss
Education
community
education
chronic illness
coalition
quality of life
Obesity
Quality of Life
minority
eating behavior
African Americans
nutrition
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Life Style
church
Fats
Exercise
expert
leader

Keywords

  • Community-based participatory research
  • Diabetes
  • Nutrition
  • Obesity
  • Peer education
  • Physical activity
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Project HEAL : Peer education leads to weight loss in harlem. / Goldfinger, Judith Z.; Arniella, Guedy; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Horowitz, Carol R.

In: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, Vol. 19, No. 1, 02.2008, p. 180-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goldfinger, Judith Z. ; Arniella, Guedy ; Wylie-Rosett, Judith ; Horowitz, Carol R. / Project HEAL : Peer education leads to weight loss in harlem. In: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. 2008 ; Vol. 19, No. 1. pp. 180-192.
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