Preoperative warm-up the key to improved resident technique: a randomized study

Erin Moran-Atkin, Gamal Abdalla, Grace Chen, Thomas H. Magnuson, Anne O. Lidor, Michael A. Schweitzer, Kimberley E. Steele

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The ACGME has required that a skills lab be incorporated into the surgical residency curriculum. While the value of warm-up is generally accepted in other areas requiring complex motor skills, there is little evidence to support the benefits of warm-up prior to performing surgery. We are conducting this study in an attempt to identify whether a warm-up period prior to operating impacts operative technique. Methods: All general surgery residents and MIS fellows were included in this IRB-approved randomized study. Participants were randomized to either warm-up or no warm-up groups. Participants randomized to the warm-up group completed a 10 min practice session in the simulation lab within 1 h of starting the case, using an FLS training box. At the conclusion of the operation, the participant was evaluated by the attending surgeon using the validated global rating scales of Reznick and Vassiliou. The attending surgeons were blinded to the use of pre-procedure warm-up. The results of the questionnaire were analyzed using student’s t test with p < 0.05 for significance. Results: Pilot data were obtained after completing 40 cases that were randomized to warm-up (19) or no warm-up (21). There was a statistically significant improvement in depth perception (p = 0.02), bimanual dexterity (p = 0.01), and efficiency of movements (p = 0.03) for those randomized to warm-up. There was statistical improvement when we preformed a composite scoring of the attending evaluations for each of the Reznick (p = 0.008) and the Vassiliou (p = 0.01) global rating scales. Conclusions: Preoperative warm-up significantly improves depth perception, bimanual dexterity, and efficiency of movements, as well as improvement in composite scores as judged by the attending surgeon. The lack of self-perceived improvement by the residents may be a reflection of the high standards and intense self-critique that is common among surgical trainees. We believe that our findings, while preliminary, reflect that surgical performance can be enhanced through structured warm-up activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1057-1063
Number of pages7
JournalSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 8 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Depth Perception
Motor Skills
Research Ethics Committees
Internship and Residency
Curriculum
Students
Surgeons
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Laparoscopy
  • Resident training
  • Simulation
  • Surgical trainee
  • Warm-up

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Preoperative warm-up the key to improved resident technique : a randomized study. / Moran-Atkin, Erin; Abdalla, Gamal; Chen, Grace; Magnuson, Thomas H.; Lidor, Anne O.; Schweitzer, Michael A.; Steele, Kimberley E.

In: Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques, Vol. 29, No. 5, 08.04.2015, p. 1057-1063.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moran-Atkin, Erin ; Abdalla, Gamal ; Chen, Grace ; Magnuson, Thomas H. ; Lidor, Anne O. ; Schweitzer, Michael A. ; Steele, Kimberley E. / Preoperative warm-up the key to improved resident technique : a randomized study. In: Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques. 2015 ; Vol. 29, No. 5. pp. 1057-1063.
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abstract = "Background: The ACGME has required that a skills lab be incorporated into the surgical residency curriculum. While the value of warm-up is generally accepted in other areas requiring complex motor skills, there is little evidence to support the benefits of warm-up prior to performing surgery. We are conducting this study in an attempt to identify whether a warm-up period prior to operating impacts operative technique. Methods: All general surgery residents and MIS fellows were included in this IRB-approved randomized study. Participants were randomized to either warm-up or no warm-up groups. Participants randomized to the warm-up group completed a 10 min practice session in the simulation lab within 1 h of starting the case, using an FLS training box. At the conclusion of the operation, the participant was evaluated by the attending surgeon using the validated global rating scales of Reznick and Vassiliou. The attending surgeons were blinded to the use of pre-procedure warm-up. The results of the questionnaire were analyzed using student’s t test with p < 0.05 for significance. Results: Pilot data were obtained after completing 40 cases that were randomized to warm-up (19) or no warm-up (21). There was a statistically significant improvement in depth perception (p = 0.02), bimanual dexterity (p = 0.01), and efficiency of movements (p = 0.03) for those randomized to warm-up. There was statistical improvement when we preformed a composite scoring of the attending evaluations for each of the Reznick (p = 0.008) and the Vassiliou (p = 0.01) global rating scales. Conclusions: Preoperative warm-up significantly improves depth perception, bimanual dexterity, and efficiency of movements, as well as improvement in composite scores as judged by the attending surgeon. The lack of self-perceived improvement by the residents may be a reflection of the high standards and intense self-critique that is common among surgical trainees. We believe that our findings, while preliminary, reflect that surgical performance can be enhanced through structured warm-up activities.",
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AU - Moran-Atkin, Erin

AU - Abdalla, Gamal

AU - Chen, Grace

AU - Magnuson, Thomas H.

AU - Lidor, Anne O.

AU - Schweitzer, Michael A.

AU - Steele, Kimberley E.

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N2 - Background: The ACGME has required that a skills lab be incorporated into the surgical residency curriculum. While the value of warm-up is generally accepted in other areas requiring complex motor skills, there is little evidence to support the benefits of warm-up prior to performing surgery. We are conducting this study in an attempt to identify whether a warm-up period prior to operating impacts operative technique. Methods: All general surgery residents and MIS fellows were included in this IRB-approved randomized study. Participants were randomized to either warm-up or no warm-up groups. Participants randomized to the warm-up group completed a 10 min practice session in the simulation lab within 1 h of starting the case, using an FLS training box. At the conclusion of the operation, the participant was evaluated by the attending surgeon using the validated global rating scales of Reznick and Vassiliou. The attending surgeons were blinded to the use of pre-procedure warm-up. The results of the questionnaire were analyzed using student’s t test with p < 0.05 for significance. Results: Pilot data were obtained after completing 40 cases that were randomized to warm-up (19) or no warm-up (21). There was a statistically significant improvement in depth perception (p = 0.02), bimanual dexterity (p = 0.01), and efficiency of movements (p = 0.03) for those randomized to warm-up. There was statistical improvement when we preformed a composite scoring of the attending evaluations for each of the Reznick (p = 0.008) and the Vassiliou (p = 0.01) global rating scales. Conclusions: Preoperative warm-up significantly improves depth perception, bimanual dexterity, and efficiency of movements, as well as improvement in composite scores as judged by the attending surgeon. The lack of self-perceived improvement by the residents may be a reflection of the high standards and intense self-critique that is common among surgical trainees. We believe that our findings, while preliminary, reflect that surgical performance can be enhanced through structured warm-up activities.

AB - Background: The ACGME has required that a skills lab be incorporated into the surgical residency curriculum. While the value of warm-up is generally accepted in other areas requiring complex motor skills, there is little evidence to support the benefits of warm-up prior to performing surgery. We are conducting this study in an attempt to identify whether a warm-up period prior to operating impacts operative technique. Methods: All general surgery residents and MIS fellows were included in this IRB-approved randomized study. Participants were randomized to either warm-up or no warm-up groups. Participants randomized to the warm-up group completed a 10 min practice session in the simulation lab within 1 h of starting the case, using an FLS training box. At the conclusion of the operation, the participant was evaluated by the attending surgeon using the validated global rating scales of Reznick and Vassiliou. The attending surgeons were blinded to the use of pre-procedure warm-up. The results of the questionnaire were analyzed using student’s t test with p < 0.05 for significance. Results: Pilot data were obtained after completing 40 cases that were randomized to warm-up (19) or no warm-up (21). There was a statistically significant improvement in depth perception (p = 0.02), bimanual dexterity (p = 0.01), and efficiency of movements (p = 0.03) for those randomized to warm-up. There was statistical improvement when we preformed a composite scoring of the attending evaluations for each of the Reznick (p = 0.008) and the Vassiliou (p = 0.01) global rating scales. Conclusions: Preoperative warm-up significantly improves depth perception, bimanual dexterity, and efficiency of movements, as well as improvement in composite scores as judged by the attending surgeon. The lack of self-perceived improvement by the residents may be a reflection of the high standards and intense self-critique that is common among surgical trainees. We believe that our findings, while preliminary, reflect that surgical performance can be enhanced through structured warm-up activities.

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