Predictors of hospitalization for HIV-positive women and men drug users, 1996-2000

Ellie Schoenbaum, Yungtai Lo, Michelle Floris-Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study sought to determine whether health outcomes differed by gender in a cohort of African American, Hispanic American, and white drug users. Methods: The authors studied hospitalization rates and discharge diagnoses in the HERO Study, an ongoing prospective study of drug users that included HIV-positive and HIV-negative opiate users. The data are from 1996-2000, when highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was available. Results: Women had higher rates of hospitalization than men independent of HIV status, and there was no association between ethnicity and hospitalization. Being a woman was an independent risk factor for HIV and non-HIV-related hospitalization. Conclusion: Health disparities between men and women extend to HIV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPublic Health Reports
Volume117
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Drug Users
Hospitalization
HIV
Opiate Alkaloids
Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy
Health
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Predictors of hospitalization for HIV-positive women and men drug users, 1996-2000. / Schoenbaum, Ellie; Lo, Yungtai; Floris-Moore, Michelle.

In: Public Health Reports, Vol. 117, No. SUPPL. 1, 2002.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{46627a3385b146458ae8898d6e23162a,
title = "Predictors of hospitalization for HIV-positive women and men drug users, 1996-2000",
abstract = "Objective: This study sought to determine whether health outcomes differed by gender in a cohort of African American, Hispanic American, and white drug users. Methods: The authors studied hospitalization rates and discharge diagnoses in the HERO Study, an ongoing prospective study of drug users that included HIV-positive and HIV-negative opiate users. The data are from 1996-2000, when highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was available. Results: Women had higher rates of hospitalization than men independent of HIV status, and there was no association between ethnicity and hospitalization. Being a woman was an independent risk factor for HIV and non-HIV-related hospitalization. Conclusion: Health disparities between men and women extend to HIV.",
author = "Ellie Schoenbaum and Yungtai Lo and Michelle Floris-Moore",
year = "2002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "117",
journal = "Public Health Reports",
issn = "0033-3549",
publisher = "Association of Schools of Public Health",
number = "SUPPL. 1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predictors of hospitalization for HIV-positive women and men drug users, 1996-2000

AU - Schoenbaum, Ellie

AU - Lo, Yungtai

AU - Floris-Moore, Michelle

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Objective: This study sought to determine whether health outcomes differed by gender in a cohort of African American, Hispanic American, and white drug users. Methods: The authors studied hospitalization rates and discharge diagnoses in the HERO Study, an ongoing prospective study of drug users that included HIV-positive and HIV-negative opiate users. The data are from 1996-2000, when highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was available. Results: Women had higher rates of hospitalization than men independent of HIV status, and there was no association between ethnicity and hospitalization. Being a woman was an independent risk factor for HIV and non-HIV-related hospitalization. Conclusion: Health disparities between men and women extend to HIV.

AB - Objective: This study sought to determine whether health outcomes differed by gender in a cohort of African American, Hispanic American, and white drug users. Methods: The authors studied hospitalization rates and discharge diagnoses in the HERO Study, an ongoing prospective study of drug users that included HIV-positive and HIV-negative opiate users. The data are from 1996-2000, when highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was available. Results: Women had higher rates of hospitalization than men independent of HIV status, and there was no association between ethnicity and hospitalization. Being a woman was an independent risk factor for HIV and non-HIV-related hospitalization. Conclusion: Health disparities between men and women extend to HIV.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036432195&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036432195&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 12435828

AN - SCOPUS:0036432195

VL - 117

JO - Public Health Reports

JF - Public Health Reports

SN - 0033-3549

IS - SUPPL. 1

ER -