Predicting and Understanding the Human Microbiome's Impact on Pharmacology

Reese Hitchings, Libusha Kelly

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Our bodies each possess a unique and dynamic collection of microbes and viruses, collectively the ‘microbiome’, with distinct metabolic capacities from our human cells. Unforeseen modification of drugs by the microbiome can drastically alter their clinical effectiveness, with the most dramatic cases leading to fatal drug interactions. Pharmaceuticals can be activated, deactivated, toxified, or release metabolites that alter the ‘canonical’ pharmacokinetics of the drug. Thus, predicting and characterizing microbe–drug interactions is necessary to develop and implement personalized drug administration protocols and, more broadly, to improve drug safety and efficacy. In this review, we focus on microbiome-driven alterations to drug pharmacokinetics and provide a research framework for pharmacologists interested in characterizing microbiome interactions with any drug of interest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)495-505
Number of pages11
JournalTrends in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume40
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

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Microbiota
Pharmacology
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Pharmacokinetics
Drug interactions
Metabolites
Drug Interactions
Viruses
Cells
Safety
Research

Keywords

  • microbiome
  • pharmacodynamics
  • pharmacology
  • xenobiotics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Predicting and Understanding the Human Microbiome's Impact on Pharmacology. / Hitchings, Reese; Kelly, Libusha.

In: Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, Vol. 40, No. 7, 01.07.2019, p. 495-505.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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