Physiological Responses to Brain Stimulation During Limbic Surgery

Further Evidence of Anterior Cingulate Modulation of Autonomic Arousal

André Felix Gentil, Emad N. Eskandar, Carl David Marci, Karleyton Conroy Evans, Darin Dean Dougherty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In view of conflicting neuroimaging results regarding autonomic-specific activity within the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), we investigated autonomic responses to direct brain stimulation during stereotactic limbic surgery. Methods: Skin conductance activity and accelerative heart rate responses to multi-voltage stimulation of the ACC (n = 7) and paralimbic subcaudate (n = 5) regions were recorded during bilateral anterior cingulotomy and bilateral subcaudate tractotomy (in patients that had previously received an adequate lesion in the ACC), respectively. Results: Stimulations in both groups were accompanied by increased autonomic arousal. Skin conductance activity was significantly increased during ACC stimulations compared with paralimbic targets at 2 V (2.34 ± .68 [score in microSiemens ± SE] vs. .34 ± .09, p = .013) and 3 V (3.52 ± .86 vs. 1.12 ± .37, p = .036), exhibiting a strong "voltage-response" relationship between stimulus magnitude and response amplitude (difference from 1 to 3 V = 1.15 ± .90 vs. 3.52 ± .86, p = .041). Heart rate response was less indicative of between-group differences. Conclusions: This is the first study of its kind aiming at seeking novel insights into the mechanisms responsible for central autonomic modulation. It supports a concept that interregional interactions account for the coordination of autonomic arousal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)695-701
Number of pages7
JournalBiological Psychiatry
Volume66
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gyrus Cinguli
Arousal
Brain
Heart Rate
Skin
Neuroimaging

Keywords

  • Anterior cingulotomy
  • autonomic nervous system
  • cingulate cortex
  • electrodermal activity
  • subcaudate tractotomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Physiological Responses to Brain Stimulation During Limbic Surgery : Further Evidence of Anterior Cingulate Modulation of Autonomic Arousal. / Gentil, André Felix; Eskandar, Emad N.; Marci, Carl David; Evans, Karleyton Conroy; Dougherty, Darin Dean.

In: Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 66, No. 7, 01.10.2009, p. 695-701.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gentil, André Felix ; Eskandar, Emad N. ; Marci, Carl David ; Evans, Karleyton Conroy ; Dougherty, Darin Dean. / Physiological Responses to Brain Stimulation During Limbic Surgery : Further Evidence of Anterior Cingulate Modulation of Autonomic Arousal. In: Biological Psychiatry. 2009 ; Vol. 66, No. 7. pp. 695-701.
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